Skip to main content

How can I get my money back from a wire transfer? (Cash Gifting Program aka Online/Internet Ponzi Scheme)

Manteca, CA |

Here is the best website I found that provides information on what a cash gifting program is & more. http://www.cashgiftingwatchdog.com/ I wired $3k to someone particpating in this type of program. Yes, I was naive. I called the person & requested my money back. The person said, no. I called my bank & tried to do a recall on the wire transfer, but the person who recieved the money blocked it. My bank called me & said all I can do now is take legal action. I have no knowledge of what to do and I NEED to recover my money. Here's the advice the site gives. http://www.cashgiftingwatchdog.com/basics/recover-your-money My mom said to file it in small claims court. I want to call & warn him about taking legal action, so hopefully he'll send my $3k. If not, I need to take legal action. Advice?

The program is well organized and operates online. It is methodical like a business, but there is absolutely no product or service. The people involved market it through various methods here in the USA and even internationally (email, phone, etc). The highest level people can 'gift' in the program is $10.5k. Before officially joining the program they have you sign two documents (basically to cover themselves). I forgot what they call the documents but I did NOT sign any of them (thank goodness). If you want to have a better understand about what CASH GIFTING PROGRAMS are, the website I provided has only a few articles but explains it all. Again, I really need the money back. We aren't supposed to state any personal information here, but please understand that I am young (teen). The $3k is a lot for me. Thank you and please help me with this.

+ Read More

Attorney answers 3

Posted

If the goal is simply to recover your $3000, then your remedy is in small claims court. It is best to write a demand letter for the return of the money, instead of simply making a telephone call. That way, you can show the letter to the judge if you are not given your money back, and there will be no dispute about what was said in the communication.

If your goal is broader than that, such as to attack the scheme as a whole, then you have other options. It may make sense to report this matter to the appropriate unit of the police, district attorney, or even the FBI. You may have civil claims to bring the scheme to a halt. On the other hand, the chances of recovering money from people who set up the scheme may be quite small. If you are seriously thinking about something other than small claims court, you should contact a lawyer first.

Asker

Posted

Hi Charles, Thank you for the quick response! My primary objective is to recover my $3k. To attack the entire scheme would require a lawyer and money on my part correct? If I could just leave a tip or lead them with some information but not be involved that would be great. I don't feel very motivated to continue on with this issue, because it's caused a lot of stress. But if others can take care of most of it I would definitely let them know all they want to know.

Asker

Posted

Sorry Charles, I reread both your messages and mine and I forgot to add something. When you mentioned it is best to write a demand letter for him to return the money did you mean email or standard mail? Thank you very much, this is so helpful and is helping clear my mind.

Charles Richard Perry

Charles Richard Perry

Posted

You will definitely need a lawyer to tackle the entire scheme. I would do the demand letter by standard mail -- if nothing else, it looks so much more professional when you present it to the judge.

Asker

Posted

Okay, I'm not prepared to go after the entire program at this time. I'll try to find his address although I'm not even sure I have it around anywhere. If I can't find his address to send the letter should I just go ahead with the small claims court case with out even notifying him?

Charles Richard Perry

Charles Richard Perry

Posted

If you don't have an address, you have a problem. The small claim papers must be served on the defendant, and they cannot be served by E-mail. Also, if you don't have an address, there's no way you'll ever be able to collect on a judgment. You need to meet with an attorney for an hour or so to help you think this through.

Asker

Posted

Thankfully I have his address now. I used whois.com and plugged in his URL, what a great resource! My next step is to fill out the small claims papers and start a court case? He will be notified correct?

Charles Richard Perry

Charles Richard Perry

Posted

No. You must serve him, in compliance with California law. The small claims resources center near the courthouse should be able to explain this to you.

Asker

Posted

Okay. I talked to another person who is an anti-scam activist and was told that because the scammer and I live in different states, small claims would be difficult. Is this true? I am starting to believe the easiest way to get my money back is to assertively tell him (through mail) to send it back either in full right away, or $1.5k one month, and the other $1.5k the next. Also to let him know that if he does not, I will file complaints to the agencies listed on cashgiftingwatchdog.com and take legal action. He lives 700+ miles away from me by the way.

Charles Richard Perry

Charles Richard Perry

Posted

It's more difficult, but not impossible. Collection will depend on where the defendant's assets are located. You may need to register your judgment in another state.

Asker

Posted

Having to register the judgement in another state is what was brought up to me by the anti-scam guy too. He agrees that I should send a request via the USPS to the scammer asking for my money back before going through all the legal hassle. He pointed me to a forum dedicated to scams and there was a thread on there that specifically talked about the program that I fell for. I'm not sure if I should post that on here, but it shows A LOT of people's personal information who were involved AND brought other people in (continued the scheme knowing it was w/o a product or service). Do you think I should have him see the forum with all the people's information to further motivate him to send me my money back? I would have to email him the link though. If so, I will do that after sending the written letter.

Charles Richard Perry

Charles Richard Perry

Posted

This forum is not an appropriate place for specific advice like this. You will need to retain a lawyer directly for further assistance here.

Posted

You may wish to file complaints with state and local authorities. The first place to file may be the San Joaquin County Sheriff's Office, https://secure.coplogic.com/dors/en/filing/selectincidenttype. The other may be the California Dep't of Corporations Financial Fraud Unit, http://www.corp.ca.gov/Forms/Complaint.asp.

The foregoing is not legal advice nor is it in any manner whatsoever meant to create or impute an attorney/client relationship.

Asker

Posted

Hi Robert, Thank you for the added information! I'll make sure to not miss this.

Posted

I agree with my colleagues.
There are ways to find the address of those people.
Found that those individuals are registered in the US with an American Domain name company located in Pennsylvania.
There are simple procedures to trace them through the company and by reporting them to ICANN
You need to be very careful. As a California Attorney and one of the very few that are Fraud Examiners ( CFE member of the Association of Certified Fraud Examiners) i receive every day alerts about new scams. . You describe in your question one of those schemes.http://sdmcduff.com and http://karamanlispowers.com

Good luck

Disclaimer: The information contained in this website is provided for informational purposes only, and should not be construed as a legal advice on any subject. No recipients of content from this site,clients or otherwise,should act or refrain from acting on the basis of any content included in the site without seeking the appropriate legal or other professional advice on the particular facts and circumstances at issue from an attorney licensed in the recipient's state. The content of this website contains general information and may not reflect current legal developments, verdicts or settlements. The Karamanlis Powers Law Offices expressly disclaims all liability in respect to actions taken or not taken based on any or all of the contents of this website, weblogs, twitter, facebook, google+.

Asker

Posted

Thank you very much! I was scared that w/o his address I would be w/o hope but I found it, thankfully. I used whois.com and plugged in his domain name and there it was. His domain name is different than the ones I posted, those sites are for victims of cash gifting schemes (like me).

Athina Karamanlis Powers

Athina Karamanlis Powers

Posted

You found the address of the domain seller. He has a privacy coverage. You need to send a certified letter to the domain registration company. Request the name of owner if they refuse you will need a subpoena . Report the domain name to I CANN. If u need help call me I am not going to charge u. You r at the right track

Asker

Posted

Hi Athina, it was the scammer's address. I verified it on an old piece of paper that I had all his info on too. I didn't post his URL on here by the way. That website was one that I found that can help me. It isn't the one that hosts the scam. WhoIs.com shows the domain registrants name if they do not have privacy for the domain. Buying and selling domains specific domains can be profitable by the way, it's like web real estate. Also sometimes the info that is shown is a company, which is the broker that sold the domain. That happens when the person who registered the domain purchased privacy from sites like whois.com. Thank you, I might call you sometime soon. I'll let you know.

Athina Karamanlis Powers

Athina Karamanlis Powers

Posted

Please do.

Business topics

Recommended articles about Business

What others are asking

Can't find what you're looking for?

Post a free question on our public forum.

Ask a Question

- or -

Search for lawyers by reviews and ratings.

Find a Lawyer