Skip to main content

How can a Diabetes and stroke patient not have her legs checked for circulation. Now is dying from gang green.

Union City, NJ |

My diabetic Mother fell in the house on the 2/25. Was admitted to the hospital by her primary doctor 2/26 where he ( primary doctor) ordered a cat scan. It revealed a cancer in her lungs and a brain tumor. He recommended surgery to remove the tumor. 3/1 The tumor is removed . Due to the surgery it resulted in my mother having a stroke on the right side of her body. She was extremely coherent 2 days after surgery. On 3/8 She was transfered to a Rehabilitation home. On 3/9 while visiting her ,my wife noticed that my mothers toe nails where black. informed the RN she told us it was swollen. From 3/11 to 3/14 she was Heavily medicated . 3/19 she was given a biopsy. 3/20 was told her right foot had to be amputated because of gang green to her knee. She originally went in for her legs!

My Mothers Primary Doctor admitted to my family that his 2 (so called) visits to the Rehab home that he never looked at her legs and "dropped the ball". How is it that the Primary Doctor, The Rehabilition home and RN's not catch this even though it was brought to their attention by numerous family members at various times. Gang green is the cause of her declining health and days for her to live not the cancer that we were prepared to fight with her. Please help.

Attorney Answers 6

Posted

There are numerous complicating factors in medical treatment, but when someone has such a dramatic bad result, it compels you to investigate it further with the assistance of a competent and experienced medical negligence attorney, who will obtain all the records and have them reviewed by a qualified expert. From your fact pattern, it does appear as if this result could and should have been avoided by appropriate care.

Each case is fact senstive, so all answers should be viewed as general advice only, and should never replace a thorough and in depth consultation with an experienced attorney. Further, an answer should not be seen as establishing an attorney-client relationship.

Mark as helpful

5 lawyers agree

5 comments

Asker

Posted

There is much more to this story that is only just a summary. I have been looking for representation before her health completely declines.

Asker

Posted

The Rehab home refuses to give up her records.

Michael David Lindner Jr

Michael David Lindner Jr

Posted

I am sure there is significantly more to this, there always is, and best to set up a time to meet and discuss the rest of the story. Every attorney that you might talk to will tell you the same thing, they need all the facts, and all the medical records to give you the opinion about the case. Feel free to call to set up a time for either a phone conference or a video call, and then after if you feel comfortable, with an in person meeting at your location. I will be in trial tomorrow and Tuesday, but you can leave a message, and I will get back to you.

Michael David Lindner Jr

Michael David Lindner Jr

Posted

any attorney can help you get the records. and they must give your mom her records

Asker

Posted

I will contact you tomorrow. Hopefully we can talk. Thank you. Mr. Lindner

Posted

It appears that you have a claim. Consult a medical malpractice attorney to review the records and advise you if the standard of care was breached.

Call for a free consultation at 727-937-1400 or visit us on the Web at www.serviceandjustice.com.

Mark as helpful

4 lawyers agree

Posted

Her medical records would need to be ordered and sent to an expert to review to ascertain whether there was a breach of the standard of care.

Mark as helpful

4 lawyers agree

Posted

I am so sorry to learn what happened to your mom. Begin to keep a diary of what happened and who said what to whom. Also, get her to a major medical center. Our nurse can call you to get details if you'd like.

Please note that these answers are provided as a community service and are not meant to create an attorney-client relationship.

Mark as helpful

2 lawyers agree

Posted

I am very sorry your mother, and you, are going through this. First, of course, is to make sure your mother is now being properly treated. Second, you should contact a medical malpractice attorney. Bring your mom's medical records, and ask the attorney to review them and help you determine whether you have a case. I would look for someone who handles not only medical malpractice, but nursing home negligence.

For a free consultation related to medical malpractice, personal injury, workers' compensation, social security disability or nursing home abuse, please contact Lowenthal & Abrams, PC at 1-800-876-5299. I am licensed in Pennsylvania, but members of my firm are licensed in Pennsylvania, New Jersey and New York. This post is not legal advice, but instead contains general educational information. Please do not act or refrain from acting based upon what you read in this post. Also please remember that this post does not form an attorney/client relationship between you and me. If you have specific legal questions, you should contact an attorney in your state for assistance. I am licensed to practice law in the state of Pennsylvania.

Mark as helpful

Posted

Without knowing the exact cause of the gangrene, it is hard to tell you whether you have a case worth investigating. Clearly, you would expect an arterial insufficiency to be noticed prior to toes turning black when a patient is under active medical care.

The problem you will have finding a lawyer is that your mother's advance age, along with her underlying health issues, make it unlikely that her claim is economically viable. There are articles linked at the end of this answer that explain that concept.

While cases against rehabilitation facilities can sometimes be economically viable when standard malpractice cases are not because those cases allow for fee shifting, it is very likely that the gangrene started prior to the admission to the rehabilitation facility, since she arrived there on 3/8 and you discovered "black toes" the day after.

It is rare and admirable that the attending doctor advised you that he dropped the ball by failing to examine the extremities, but depending when those examinations took place, the doctor may have a proximate cause defense to a claim.

Please note that by attempting to answer your question, I am not acting as your attorney. I will do nothing further to protect or preserve your interests in the absence of any additional discussion with you about this matter. John Ratkowitz, Esq. Starr, Gern, Davison & Rubin, P.C. 105 Eisenhower Parkway Roseland, NJ 07068 jratkowitz@starrgern.com Office: (973) 830-8441 Cell: (732) 616-6278 Fax: (973) 226-0031 Skype: john_ratkowitz Web: www.starrgern.com

Mark as helpful

Personal injury topics

Top tips from attorneys

What others are asking

Can't find what you're looking for?

Post a free question on our public forum.

Ask a Question

- or -

Search for lawyers by reviews and ratings.

Find a Lawyer

Browse all legal topics