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Hello I live in New York City, is Rent Stabilized Apartment. I have a roomate, Landlord told me guy has move out

New York, NY |

This started because I have lived there about 6 years and complained about bedbugs. They are throughout the building and appeared in my apartment.

Landlord inspected, , mentioned my place was a mess, that I subdivided the apartment w/bookcase, moved in a roommate, violated the lease- claims my roommate
-brought in the bedbugs
-must move out immediately.

The building has a history of Bedbug infestations, full info withheld when I asked
The Landlord and Super, advised they will not tell people as to avoid panic. Landlord claimed they are everywhere in NY

So, main question, what are my rights concerning the 1 roommate I have? does a Roommate Law(?) protect me? What will/could happen?

I am the only one mentioned on the Lease. The landlord accused me of having a pertinent roommate is the problem

Attorney Answers 3

Posted

Dear New York Tenant:

New York State law prohibits a landlord interfering with a tenant's right to a roommate. Period. The statute provides a legal remedy for a tenant suffering a landlord messing with the legal right to a roommate.

Good luck.

The answer provided to you is in the nature of general information. The general proposition being that you should try to avoid a bad outcome if you can.

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Posted

Your current lease should dictate the terms of your ability to have a roommate. The condition of the property / bedbugs are a separate and distinct issue from an additional tenant. You should consult a landlord tenant attorney to determine your rights and if your apartment is inhabitable.

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Posted

I agree with Mr. Smollens, but want to point out - because there always seems to be confusion in this area - that it's of no consequence that you call him your roommate if you are collecting rent. Collecting rent makes him a tenant and then you do not have the absolute right to sublet absent an agreement (like the lease with your landlord). So, be careful.

I may be guessing or not licensed in your state. No atty/client relationship exists. I earn my living collecting points for "helpful" answers.

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