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Getting out of my lease? (VERY IMPORTANT READ BELOW)

Troy, MI |

I've been haveing problems with my roommates all year and have expressed my desire to move out. This is a joint contract and my roommates have been uncooperative and said they would not let me sublease. I've been harassed, blackmailed and my personal safety is threatened. Among that I have been having communication problems and have been ganged up on by my other two roommates. I go to Michigan State, my grades have dropped and I do not feel comfortable or safe in any way living in that apartment anymore. I moved out already on the 23rd of June, took pictures of the areas in my apt I am responsible for, sent letters to both my roommates that I moved out, and have spoken with the landlord as well. Also, my roommates have not been paying utilities to me and have unpaid rent as well.

I am also speaking with a lawyer next week as well. I feel imprisoned in my lease contract and I just want this to be settled, I have cut off all communication with my roommates too.

Attorney Answers 2


Your personal problems with co-tenants are not the landlord's problems. You will all be personally liable if landlord (or utilities) go to court for any unpaid balance of rent and damages to the premises. Good idea to see attorney in your area about your options.

The above answer is generalized reply to an question and is not intended to be legal advice or establish an attorney-client relationship with you. If necessary you should meet with an attorney and provide the attorney with all relevant documents and get an attorney opinion or advice on your situation.

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As my colleague said, your obligations to your landlord, including the obligation to pay rent, is independent from your agreement with your roommates. You may get permission from the landlord to sublease; I don't see how your co-tenants can place any restrictions upon you in addition to those already in your lease with your landlord.

That being said, please consult with a local attorney. You have a lot going on in this situation and may have legal recourse against your former roommates.

DISCLAIMER: Brandy A. Peeples is licensed to practice law in the State of Maryland. This answer is being provided for informational purposes only and the laws of your jurisdiction may differ. This answer based on general legal principles and is not intended for the purpose of providing specific legal advice or opinions. Under no circumstances does this answer constitute the establishment of an attorney-client relationship. For legal advice relating to your specific situation, I strongly urge you to consult with an attorney in your area. NO COMMUNICATIONS WITH ME ARE TO BE CONSTRUED AS ARISING FROM AN ATTORNEY-CLIENT RELATIONSHIP AND NO ATTORNEY-CLIENT RELATIONSHIP WILL BE ESTABLISHED WITH ME UNLESS I HAVE EXPRESSLY AGREED TO UNDERTAKE YOUR REPRESENTATION, WHICH INCLUDES THE EXECUTION OF A WRITTEN AGREEMENT OF RETAINER.

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