Foreign Passport with no Visa "stamp", can you still use it to travel within the United States?

Asked 6 months ago - Staten Island, NY

My mother will be going to our national consulate in NYC to get a new passport. However In the United States she doesn't have legal residency. I have heard many family members that say they've traveled this way for a long time without being hassled, is there any truth to this?

Attorney answers (4)

  1. Giacomo Jacques Behar

    Pro

    Contributor Level 20

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    Answered . Yes, there is a lot of "truth" in what you heard. The TSA, in it's ever infinite wisdom, while seeing foreign passports in its "security" lines by the hundreds,, shift after shift, day after day, has no clue as to what a "visa" is and never, to my knowledge looking to see whether a foreign national has a US "stamp" (or any "stamp"), let alone "proof of residency" (wouldn't know what that means even if you explained it half a dozen times..) in one's passport.

    Kindly be advised that the answer above is only general in nature cannot be construed as legal advice, given that... more
  2. Michael Charles Doland

    Contributor Level 20

    3

    Lawyers agree

    Answered . No one ever checks your passport when travelling from state to state. Passports are for travelling from country to country.

    The above is general legal and business analysis. It is not "legal advice" but analysis, and different lawyers may... more
  3. F. J. Capriotti III

    Contributor Level 20

    2

    Lawyers agree

    Answered . Although my colleague is correct, passports are for international travel, if that is her only form of ID ... someone at TSA may 'flag' her.

    Probably not, but it is possible..

    Why not meet with an immigration lawyer (many of us use Skype) and see if you can get your mother legal?

    PROFESSOR OF IMMIGRATION LAW for over 10 years -- This blog posting is offered for informational purposes only. It... more
  4. L. Vincent Ramunno

    Contributor Level 14

    1

    Lawyer agrees

    Answered . interesting question, you could ask a local attorney, or see what the passport or department of state website says

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