Early separation from the military due to anxiety and panic disorder. Now I have a large debt from DOD. Can anything be done?

Asked over 1 year ago - Plano, TX

I joined the Navy January of 2008 with a five year contract. After completing one year of training, we signed another contract that extended us another year, making 6 in total. After two years in, which was all in training commands I was sent to a ship. About 6 months after being aboard the ship I decided to reelinst for an additional two years making my total service being 8 years. During the time I had been in, I had been dealing with anxiety and panic disorder off and on. I was able to get counseling and therapy and that seemed to work. Due to my job, we were not allowed to take any drugs or we would be disqualified. I ended up having to go on medication while on deployment and then immediately got disqualified. I am now out and I now have a large debt to the DOD. Can anything be done?

Additional information

Since I have been out, I have been attending school for one year. I am concerned that this debt will eventually have an effect on my benefits and school will no longer be paid for. I have tried to talk to the Defense Finance and Accounting Service about what I can do, but they are not will to work with me outside of what they offer. Which I cannot do. I have tried to explain my situation and see if they would settle for a lesser amount, but still no. I just don't know what to do right now. If you don't know the answer to my question, can someone please point me in the right direction? I live in the Dallas area.

Attorney answers (5)

  1. Philip Douglas Cave

    Pro

    Contributor Level 17

    4

    Lawyers agree

    Answered . What's the debt for?
    If it is a recoupment, then you would have been provided information at the time of notification about a repayment plan or seeking a waiver of indebtedness.

    www.court-martial.com; www.court-martial.us.com; mljucmj@gmail.com 703-298-9562, 800-401-1583. Answering your... more
  2. Rixon Charles Rafter III

    Contributor Level 20

    2

    Lawyers agree

    Answered . Your story has bits in it that do not make sense. Recommend you repost with the correct version and ALL the facts. Your reenlistments and added years did not happen as you described. Neither did the reason you left, or the debt. We're here to help, but you can't give us BS.

    READ THIS BEFORE CALLING OR EMAILING ME: I am licensed to practice before the state and federal courts in Virginia.... more
  3. Gerald Richard Healy

    Pro

    Contributor Level 12

    1

    Lawyer agrees

    Answered . How much of a debt? You want to think about a second mortgage or equity line, both of which are right around prime (2.99%)...which makes for a easier monthly payment. Is the anxiety service-related?

  4. Andrew David Cherkasky

    Contributor Level 10

    1

    Lawyer agrees

    Answered . Most debts established through the military are "federal debts" which can be recouped in a number of very intrusive manners (ie withholding tax returns, etc). Without more information, the military attorneys on this website will have trouble giving you an idea of whether you can fight the debt. It's also important to consult about the potential for VA benefits if your anxiety is service related. In the end, you may be able to offset debt with a monthly VA check. Myself and the gentlemen above all have experience handling situations like yours or can refer you to others with more specialized experience in VA work.
    www.BestMilitaryDefense.com

    Andrew Cherkasky of Cherkasky Law, LLC is an Illinois attorney focused on military & criminal defense. The advice... more
  5. Wojciech Zbigniew Kornacki

    Contributor Level 12

    Answered . You should review the terms of your contact/re-enlistment/or any bonuses you received. Your contract will detail the terms of waiver of any debt you would have or under what grounds you would have to repay it back. If you are having issues, recommend you contact a military law attorney.

    This information is intended for public use only, it does not form an attorney-client relationship and it does not... more

Can't find what you're looking for? Ask a Lawyer

Get free answers from experienced attorneys.

 

Ask now

27,841 answers this week

3,080 attorneys answering

Ask a Lawyer

Get answers from top-rated lawyers.

  • It's FREE
  • It's easy
  • It's anonymous

27,841 answers this week

3,080 attorneys answering