Does these conditions of the private Real Estate sale/agreement/mortgage with in-laws leave me unprotected against lost?

Asked over 1 year ago - Wilder, ID

1) I am the primary income and my earnings will pay the mortgage.
2) My in-laws will hold mortgage thru title co.
3) Conditions in mortgage: My husband will be sole owner of mortgage. He may not make any changes in title, or quitclaim deed until mortgage is satisfied.
4) My husband has signed all the docs in mortgage agreement; I was present.
5) I have suddenly been told (at the last moment, as getting ready to fund and file the legal agreement) that I must sign and notarize a quitclaim deed and that it is "no big deal, conveniently, the agent is a notary and can come to me to get it done really quick without any inconvenience."
6) The mortgage has no mention me, or provisions regarding me and "our investments" in "our" home if something were to happen to my husband.

Attorney answers (4)

  1. Howard M Lewis

    Pro

    Contributor Level 20

    3

    Lawyers agree

    10

    Answered . You really need to be on the title please be careful and work with a local attny, take care.

    Legal disclaimer: The response given is not intended to create, nor does it create an ongoing duty to respond to... more
  2. Paula Brown Sinclair

    Contributor Level 20

    3

    Lawyers agree

    Answered . Three out of state attorneys, competent though they may be, have definitely missed the point here. Idaho is a community property state. Property acquired during a marriage is presumed to be community, but that presumption can be overcome with documents that provide otherwise. That is clearly what you in-laws are setting up. You are mixed up on your terminology. The quitclaim deed will give up any claim you might have to the house by virtue of your marriage, and in the mortgage agreement your husband appears to be giving up the right to share the ownership with you at any time until the mortgage.

    Whether this is a deal you are willing to make is something you will want to discuss with experienced local counsel. You cannot make an informed decision in your own best interests until you understand what your inlaws are proposing to do.

    Best wishes for an outcome you can accept, and please remember to designate a best answer.

    This answer is offered as a public service for general information only and may not be relied upon as legal advice.
  3. Celia R Reed

    Contributor Level 20

    4

    Lawyers agree

    Answered . Your fact pattern is unclear and does not add up. If your in-laws are funding the house, your husband can not own the mortgage. If you are making all the payments, your name should be on the title. Talk to a real estate attorney before signing anything.

    Please note that I am answering this question as a service through Avvo but not as your attorney and no attorney-... more
  4. Cheryl Rivera Smith

    Contributor Level 20

    4

    Lawyers agree

    Answered . You should contact a local attorney to represent your interests.

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