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Does the landlord have to get the carpets cleaned and paint the walls between tenants? Is the tenant responsible to pay for it?

Minneapolis, MN |

My landlord is saying carpets should only need to be cleaned every 3-5 years and walls painted every 5-8 years with "normal wear and tear". That seems disgusting to me and I keep my home clean. Also, the paint used in the apt doesn't allow for cleaning the walls as it was coming off when I tried and revealed any imperfections that were underneath. How am I supposed to keep the walls clean if they use cheap paint that comes off with water or the carpets perfect when they are a light beige?

Attorney Answers 2


I highly suggest consulting a landlord/tenant attorney about your issue. Under state law a landlord has a responsibility to make reasonable repairs to the property. This duty cannot be waived, but it can be altered to a degree by the lease agreement. Depending upon what your lease says you may be able to either paint the walls yourself and/or sue for a reduction of rent if the landlord refuses to do it and he/she agreed to do it in the lease.

Again, I suggest consulting an attorney with a copy of your lease to determine the best route to go. If you have any questions, feel free to contact me.

Andrew C. Thompson, Attorney at Law, 1539 Grand Avenue, St. Paul, MN 55105, (651) 698-2181, I am providing this information solely for informational purposes. The information you obtain at this site is not, nor is it intended to be, legal advice. Nothing transmitted in this posting establishes an attorney-client relationship. You should consult an attorney for advice regarding your individual situation. You are welcome to contact me personally in anyway. However, such contact does not create an attorney-client relationship. Please do not send any confidential information to me until such time as an attorney-client relationship has been established.

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There is no legal obligation to paint the walls or to change out carpeting. If the property becomes uninhabitable, you have rights to pursue a rent abatement action to try and reduce the rent.

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