Does my child support payments automatically stop when my son turns 18?

Asked 7 months ago - Tempe, AZ

My son will turn 18 this month. I have been paying child support for both of my sons (the other son is 24) until now. My divorce decree states until my son turns 18 . This month should be the last month I pay child support . Does the court automatically stop deductions from my paycheck . Do I have to submitt payper work to the court to make this happen?Please advice .
Thanks

Attorney answers (2)

  1. Monica H Donaldson Stewart

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    Contributor Level 15

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    Answered . Generally speaking, child support continues until a child reaches age 18 or high school graduation, whichever comes later (but not past age 19). If your son is still in high school, it may be premature to discuss terminating the child support obligation; however, if he has graduated or is not enrolled in high school, your obligation may be reaching an end. If you are paying by automatic wage assignment, you must file a request with the court to stop the assignment (the court does not terminate the assignment automatically). If you are current in your child support obligation, the process to terminate the assignment should be straightforward; however, if you owe any arrears, this will have to be addressed. I recommend you consult with an attorney to discuss this situation in greater detail. Many law firms, including ours, offer a free initial consultation.

    ** This response is provided as general information only and does not constitute legal advice or otherwise... more
  2. Steven W Zachary

    Contributor Level 17

    Answered . I recommend that you file the necessary documents with the court to stop the payments. If the ex agrees on the date you can file a joint form. If not you will have to file the document, serve her and have the court rule on it. If your son is still in high school, the order might state that child support ends upon graduation from high school. You will want to check the original order to see what it says. To make sure it is done correctly, you may want to consult an attorney

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