Does a Living Trust replace the need for a having a will?

Asked about 1 year ago - Garden Grove, CA

I have an outdated will and will be creating a Living Trust. I assume I won't need to update my will. Is that a correct assumption?

Attorney answers (7)

  1. Charles Adam Shultz

    Contributor Level 19

    9

    Lawyers agree

    Answered . No. Even if you have a fully funded trust, you should still have a will in case something is missed or probate is needed for some other reason. If you restate your trust, you should update your Will to mention the restated trust. Also, be sure your executor is still who you would want.

    The general advice above does not constitute an attorney-client relationship: you haven't hired me or my firm or... more
  2. Robin Mashal

    Contributor Level 19

    9

    Lawyers agree

    Answered . Disclaimer: The materials provided below are informational and should not be relied upon as legal advice.

    As my colleagues properly point out, it would behoove you to prepare a "pour-over" will along with your living trust. This way, any items in your estate not directly placed in your living trust will be poured over into the trust. Be sure to consult your own attorney to protect your legal rights.

  3. Christine James

    Pro

    Contributor Level 19

    7

    Lawyers agree

    Answered . That is technically a correct assumption and the attorney who drafts your estate plan can go over it in more detail with you. Usually when someone creates a trust it supercedes all previous estate planning documents. I assume your current will details what you want to happen with your estate and who you want to be in control of it. The new trust will do that as well thereby making that will obsolete. That said, most estate plans include a pour-over will. This will usually does not have any specific bequests in it, but simply names an executor and states that the property will be distributed to the trustee of the trust to be distributed pursuant to the terms of the trust. This document is done so that if something is not properly funded into your trust and must go through probate, that will can be probated but the items will end up back in your trust and distributed under the terms of your trust. Hope this helps.

  4. Timothy Joseph Hardesty

    Contributor Level 11

    8

    Lawyers agree

    Answered . While it is true that anything in a living trust will pass outside of the probate process, it is generally a good idea to have a Will that leaves any assets remaining in the estate to the Trust. Sometimes an asset doesn't get transferred, which may require probate. In the absence of an updated Will, or any Will, that asset would not necessarilly go where you wanted it to go.

  5. Susan Kathryn Ashabraner

    Contributor Level 13

    5

    Lawyers agree

    Answered . The attorney who drafts your revocable living trust will also draft a pourover will, which will supercede your existing will.

  6. Brian Scott Mandel

    Pro

    Contributor Level 7

    1

    Lawyer agrees

    Answered . You would also need a will if you have minor children and want to name a guardian.

  7. Joseph Franklin Pippen Jr.

    Pro

    Contributor Level 20

    2

    Lawyers agree

    Answered . Most all trusts are created with "pour over" wills.
    They leave everything to your trust that you failed
    to retitle in the trust name and also handle personal
    items like jewelry.

    The answer given does not imply that an attorney-client relationship has been established and your best course of... more

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