Do i plead guilty or non guilty in court? what do I say?

Asked over 1 year ago - Hutchinson, KS

My boyfriend and I got in an argument and cops were called, he grabbed my things and i grabbed his shirt to get it and scratched him on accident causing a batter charge and he threw some of my belongings and broke one then i hit his mirror not meaning to break it and cracked it. He didn't press charges and wanted nothing bad to come out of it but they just arrested us both. and my charges are battery and criminal damage of property

Attorney answers (3)

  1. James Kevin Hayslett

    Pro

    Contributor Level 16

    4

    Lawyers agree

    Answered . You need to plead not guilty and request time to hire a lawyer.
    I would recommend that you find a lawyer from this forum in your town and interviewed two or three to assist you with your case.
    If you have no prior record you may be eligible for a diversion program meaning you could get your case dismissed.
    Your record is too important.

  2. Robert C. Gigstad

    Contributor Level 10

    2

    Lawyers agree

    Answered . You should plead Not Guilty, and then request time to hire an attorney. If you cannot afford an attorney you may be able to have one appointed to you by the court. These types of cases rely heavily on testimony and or statements from the other party. You definitely need to speak with an attorney to discuss your case, and figure out what your options are.

  3. Joshua D. Seiden

    Contributor Level 8

    1

    Lawyer agrees

    Answered . Plead "Not Guilty," and engage an attorney as soon as possible. Do not discuss your case with anyone other than your attorney.

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