Skip to main content

Do I have to show up for a termination of guardianship hearing?

Modesto, CA |

If the court experts are all recommending guardianship be terminated and I am the guardian, do I have to attend or will I get in trouble for refusing to attend? I am not planning to make a statement or argue it, I just want the case done. I have no attorney at this time. I feel that attending would be too upsetting for me and I have high blood pressure and anxiety.

Attorney Answers 3


The problem if you dont attend is you have no say in what happens. The court could possibly do more than just terminate. Unless you attend, you are too open. I would not recommend it.

The general advice above does not constitute an attorney-client relationship: you haven't hired me or my firm or given me confidential information by posting on this public forum, and my answer on this public forum does not constitute attorney-client advice. IRS Circular 230 Disclosure: In order to comply with requirements imposed by the Internal Revenue Service, we inform you that any U.S. tax advice contained in this communication (including any attachments) is not intended to be used, and cannot be used, for the purpose of (i) avoiding penalties under the Internal Revenue Code or (ii) promoting, marketing, or recommending to another party any transaction or matter addressed herein. While I am licensed to practice in New York and California, I do not actively practice in New York. Regardless, nothing said should be deemed an opinion of law of any state. All readers need to do their own research or pay an attorney for a legal opinion if one is necessary or desired.

Mark as helpful

2 found this helpful

4 lawyers agree


Go to court. Having that type of closure will be helpful, then you will know that the matter is complete.

Mark as helpful

1 found this helpful

4 lawyers agree


You can get court-ordered visitation as a prior guardian if you request it and the court finds it appropriate. If you absolutely do not want to go, then I would at least contact the other party and let them know you aren't showing. I would advise you go ahead and go however. You never know what could work out in court.

The answers offered by this attorney are for general information purposes only and you should not take action based on these answers without first speaking with an attorney who can go over all the facts of your case in person. Every case is different; a change in facts results in a different answer.

Mark as helpful

4 lawyers agree

Wills and estates topics

Recommended articles about Wills and estates

What others are asking

Can't find what you're looking for?

Post a free question on our public forum.

Ask a Question

- or -

Search for lawyers by reviews and ratings.

Find a Lawyer

Browse all legal topics