Do I have to appear in court for a traffic violation hearing when I'm not fighting the ticket?

Asked 10 months ago - Pittsburgh, PA

I received my first speeding ticket for (supposedly) going 83 on a 65 mph interstate, out of state in Wisconsin back in August. I paid the almost $400 fine & accepted 4 points but now I received a notice of hearing ("must be personally present") to appear in court next month. I'm a full time student with almost no money and no time; it would be near impossible for me to buy a plane ticket and rent a car to go out to Wisconsin when I'm not even fighting the ticket. What are my options? Thank you in advance!

Attorney answers (5)

  1. Christopher Edwin Miller

    Contributor Level 10

    3

    Lawyers agree

    1

    Answered . If you paid the fine and got points already, this notice of hearing can't be to simply pay the ticket (you already did that). Look on the paper, find the docket number and look up what the case is about. You may also want to call the local court. If you cannot solve the problem that way, call a local attorney who can advise you about how to handle the situation, he will most likely be able to appear on your behalf.

  2. Jeffrey Andrew Rowe

    Contributor Level 14

    3

    Lawyers agree

    1

    Answered . A Wisconsin attorney would be able to address this best. It sounds very odd that they would make you appear if you've already paid the fine and plead guilty to the offense, but every state has its quirks. Hopefully, local counsel will be able to appear on your behalf or can arrange for you to appear via phone, but that all depends on the judge. Most that I encounter here in central PA require personal attendance if a hearing has been scheduled.

  3. Robert Francis Gruler Jr.

    Pro

    Contributor Level 11

    3

    Lawyers agree

    Answered . If this was written as a criminal speeding violation it will not be as simple as just paying a fine and calling it a day. If this is the case, you will likely be required to appear or need to have an attorney appear on your behalf. If it was just civil, you will probably be able to resolve most of this over the phone, but an attorney in your state will better be able to assist you in the process.

  4. Daniel Patrick Emkey

    Contributor Level 7

    Answered . The best thing you can do is contact a local (Wisconsin) defense attorney. Many attorneys are willing to discuss your case and explain why you do or do not need to appear for court.

  5. Peter Christian Komar

    Contributor Level 14

    1

    Lawyer agrees

    1

    Answered . I would contact a local attorney, your appearance may be waived by contacting a attorney you show without your presence.

Can't find what you're looking for? Ask a Lawyer

Get free answers from experienced attorneys.

 

Ask now

25,797 answers this week

2,771 attorneys answering

Ask a Lawyer

Get answers from top-rated lawyers.

  • It's FREE
  • It's easy
  • It's anonymous

25,797 answers this week

2,771 attorneys answering