Do I have recourse against a private party whom I bought a used grand cherokee from that literally died on the way home

Asked almost 5 years ago - Wenatchee, WA

Purchased a used Jeep Grand Cherokee from a private party and the transfer case literally blew up on the way home from buying it! Is there anything I can do? I have a string of emails stating that the seller had the transfer case checked by a mechanic prior to purchase.

Additional information

Does the Washington state's lemon law apply here (to a private party transaction)?

Attorney answers (1)

  1. Ronald Lee Burdge

    Contributor Level 20

    Answered . Maybe. Buying a car in a private sale can be risky business because the law is very different from a car dealer sale. In a sale between two individuals, neither of whom is a car dealer, in most states the only obligation on the seller is to answer your questions honestly and not hide anything that they realize you would want to know about. They have to tell the truth about the mileage on the car too by filling out correctly and honestly an odometer statement for the buyer. And in those states that require mandatory emissions tests in order to get a vehicle licensed, many of those states say that if the emission/pollution equipment was disabled or removed then the buyer may have the right to cancel the sale. If none of that applies to your deal, then you may be stuck. To find out for sure, you need to talk to a local Consumer Law attorney. Call your local attorney's Bar Association and ask for a referral to a Consumer Law attorney near you or you can go to this web site page for a Free Online 50 State National List of Consumer Law Lawyers (http://www.ohiolemonlaw.com/ocll-site/ocll-loca...) and find one near you (lawyers don’t pay to get listed here and most of them are members of the only national association for Consumer Law lawyers, NACA.net). But act quickly because for every legal right you have, there is only a limited amount of time to actually file a lawsuit in court or your rights expire (it's called the statute of limitations), so don't waste your time getting to a Consumer Law attorney and finding out what your rights are. If this answer was helpful, please check the box below.

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