Do I have grounds for lawsuit?

Asked about 5 years ago - Paducah, KY

Drunk co-worker swung at me during after work get-together in Paducah, KY. Broke his nose and restrained him. Supervisor sent me home under "disciplinary suspension". According to company policy we both should have been fired for fighting. He called me the "n" word and swung first. Do I have any legal recourse to keep my job.

Attorney answers (2)

  1. Erik Glen Swanson

    Contributor Level 15

    Answered . You should consult with an attorney. You may have several claims: you may have a civil action against your co-worker for assault and battery; you may have a workers compensation claim, if you were injured on the job; you may have a wrongful termination claim against your company.

    An attorney will be able to analyze the facts and law and determine which, if any, of these claims are in fact valid.

    Disclaimer: This answer is provided as a public service and as a general response to a general question, it is not meant, and should not be relied upon as specific legal advice, nor does it create an attorney-client relationship.

  2. Alan James Brinkmeier

    Contributor Level 20

    Answered . You have potential tort claims to bring.

    You might find my Legal Guide helpful "How to Choose A Lawyer For You"

    http://www.avvo.com/legal-guides/ugc/how-to-cho...

    You might find my Legal Guide helpful " What Do I Tell My Lawyer"

    http://www.avvo.com/legal-guides/ugc/what-do-i-...

    No one can know what the record is in the case because online we cannot see your documents. You need a lawyer. Check with a lawyer in your locale to discuss more of the details.

    Good luck to you.

    NOTE: This answer is made available by the lawyer for educational purposes only. By using or participating in this site you understand that there is no attorney client privilege between you and the attorney responding. This site should not be used as a substitute for competent legal advice from a licensed professional attorney with whom you have established an attorney client relationship and all the privileges that relationship provides. The law changes frequently and varies from jurisdiction to jurisdiction. The information and materials provided are general in nature, and may not apply to a specific factual or legal circumstance described in the question.

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