Do I have any legal recourse for a old friend destroying my car and saying he wont pay to have it replaced or fixed?

Asked 5 months ago - Denver, CO

He did already say he would replace the car, but now he is saying he wont.

Attorney answers (5)

  1. Christopher Daniel Leroi

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    Contributor Level 20

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    Answered . If he destroyed your car, you can sue him in small claims court if the car was worth less than $7,500 or in county court if the damage was $15,000 or less. If he destroyed it in an accident, you will allege negligence. If they took a sledgehammer to it (hopefully not), then there are other legal theories relating to criminal mischief would be appropriate.

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  2. Christian K. Lassen II

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    Contributor Level 20

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    Answered . If your insurance won't cover it, and it is a small amount, go to small claims court.

  3. David Ian Schoen

    Pro

    Contributor Level 20

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    Answered . What you should do may depend on the value of your car.

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  4. Gerald R Stahl

    Pro

    Contributor Level 16

    Answered . You should take your old friend to court to recover damage . Certainly, your strategy will depend upon how the car was destroyed. Seek the advice of a local attorney. Good Luck!

  5. Lars A. Lundeen

    Pro

    Contributor Level 20

    1

    Lawyer agrees

    Answered . File suit against your former friend in the appropriate court..

    Legal Disclaimer:

    If this information has been helpful, please indicate below.

    Mr. Lundeen is licensed to practice law in Florida and Vermont. The response herein is not legal advice and does not create an attorney/client relationship. The response is in the form of legal education and is intended to provide general information about the matter within the question. Oftentimes the question does not include significant and important facts and timelines that, if known, could significantly change the reply and make it unsuitable. Mr. Lundeen strongly advises the questioner to confer with an attorney in your state in order to ensure proper advice is received.

    This ans. does not create an attorney/client relationship.

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