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Do I have a warrant in arizona

Boston, MA |

About five years ago I was living in Arizona. I was involved in a domestic situation, cops were called. The woman who called the cops didn't press charges (it was a complete misunderstanding) I moved away and received papers saying I needed to go to court for this. I no longer lived in Arizona so I called the court, they said I need to show and wouldn't work with me. I also pleaded via mail, fax and certified mail. They still said I needed to be there. So fast forward to today, five years later and I'm wondering if I have a warrant and how I can handle this from out of state? Also does this show up on a fingerprinting criminal background check? Thank you!

Attorney Answers 6

Posted

Yes, you have a warrant outstanding in Arizona. This may or may not show up on a background check, depending upon the nature of the charges and the extent of a check performed on you. If you have reported employment and residence in AZ, then it is likely that the investigator will check your criminal background there and discover the outstanding warrant.

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Asker

Posted

Thank you for the response but I would still like to know what to do from here? Should I get an Arizona attorney or just call the court clerks office?

Lauren Craig Redmond

Lauren Craig Redmond

Posted

Get a criminal defense attorney that practices in the part of Arizona where the incident happened. Every attorney has advised you to do that, including me. Take our advice to heart.

Posted

Yes, you most likely have a default warrant. As for your question on how to handle the situation from out of state-you need to contact an Arizona attorney. Good luck.

The answer to this question is for informational purposes only and is expressly not legal advice. This information is not intended to create, and receipt of it does not constitute, a lawyer-client relationship. Readers should not act upon this without seeking advice from professional advisers

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You need to hire an AZ criminal defense attorney to locate the case, set aside any warrant that may be outstanding and resolve the matter. The attorney will advise as to what, if any, options are available to you,

I am trying to give you a general answer to your question. We do not have an attorney-client relationship by this response on the avvo website. I have not been retained to represent you. I am licensed to practice law in Kentucky and in federal court in this state and the Southern District of Indiana. You need to seek legal advice from an attorney licensed to practice in your area..

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Posted

It is likely that you have a warrant. It is possible that it will show up on a background check. It may also at some point result in your license being suspended in Massachusetts. Some states have reciprocal agreements and can suspend your license for issues in other states. Massachusetts has this type of agreement with many states. Contact a criminal defense attorney in the area where this happened in Arizona. That attorney should be able to confirm with the court that the warrant exists and can advise you on how best to handle it. I have at times been able to handle cases involving warrants in Massachusetts without the person appearing. Generally though, in this state, a person does need to appear to address the issue. The lawyer may be able to speak with the Arizona prosecutor and have everything prepared in advance to address the case on one date and resolve the matter once and for all. This will prevent you from having to make multiple trips back.

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Asker

Posted

Thank you!

Steven D. Power

Steven D. Power

Posted

My pleasure.

Posted

You cannot

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Posted

If you responded in pleadings via mail, then you essentially consented to the Arizona court having jurisdiction over you. This means, if you failed to show for a hearing, a default warrant was likely issued against you. The warrant procedures differ from state to state, but missing a scheduled court date in most circumstances = a warrant being issued agaisnt you.

Warrants do show up on fingerprint criminal background checks. In fact, I suspect that if you get arrested in Mass., this Arizona default warrant may pop up.

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