Divorce after GC had been issued, can I still apply for US citizenship?

Asked 6 months ago - Bronx, NY

I just got my 10-year- Green card from marriage to my US citizen husband today 10/21. After long months of arguments, misunderstandings and all that, I decided to file for divorce. Can this affect my application for citizenship? And what else do I need from my (future - ex) husband in order to be naturalized?

Attorney answers (4)

  1. Aneliya M. Angelova

    Pro

    Contributor Level 18

    4

    Lawyers agree

    1

    Answered . You won't be able to file under the 3 year rule (spouses of US citizens) but you can still file after 4 years and 9 months of being a permanent resident. However, your immediate divorce after the the approval of your permanent green card may raise some suspicion and questions during your naturalization interview.

    This answer is for informational purposes only and should not be construed as legal advice.
  2. Angela Teide Moore

    Contributor Level 13

    1

    Lawyer agrees

    Answered . Why divorce so soon after your green card was granted. Definitely suspicious. You can still file for citizenship but you will have to wait for 4 years and 9 months from when you received your green card.

  3. Christian K. Lassen II

    Pro

    Contributor Level 20

    2

    Lawyers agree

    Answered . can file after 4 years and 3 months

  4. Tripti Sharad Sharma

    Contributor Level 18

    1

    Lawyer agrees

    1

    Answered . If you are not married and living with your USC spouse, you will wait for 4 years and 9 months from acquiring residency to apply for naturalization. You do not need any documents from your spouse.

    This response is general in nature and cannot be construed as legal advice, given that not enough facts are known.... more

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