Defamation of character by email

Asked over 3 years ago - San Diego, CA

A man sent emails to other people. The emails made accusations that would expose a person to hate or obloquy. The accusations are completely false. How much should the man be sued for?

Attorney answers (2)

  1. Christian K. Lassen II

    Pro

    Contributor Level 20

    1

    Lawyer agrees

    5

    Answered . Damages are based on a host of factors. Libel is publishing in print, which includes pictures, an untruth about another which will do harm to that person or his or her reputation, by tending to bring the target into ridicule, hatred, scorn or contempt of others. Contact a local defamation lawyer for a free consultation to protect your rights and reputation.


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  2. Robert Daniel Kelly

    Pro

    Contributor Level 20

    Answered . You need to speak with an attorney. An attorney can help you determine the answers to your questions in light of the particular facts of your case. Good luck.

    Typically, the elements of a cause of action for defamation include:
    A false and defamatory statement concerning another;
    The unprivileged publication of the statement to a third party (that is, somebody other than the person defamed by the statement);
    If the defamatory matter is of public concern, fault amounting at least to negligence on the part of the publisher; and
    Damage to the plaintiff.
    http://www.expertlaw.com/library/personal_injur...

    The plaintiff usually has the burden of proving his case (including the amount of the damages) by a preponderance of the evidence (what is more probable than not).

    [Please note: this communication does not constitute legal advice, nor does it form an attorney-client relationship. The author is licensed to practice law only in the State of Washington.]

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