Claiming unemployment after accepting a job and quiting?

Asked over 4 years ago - Milwaukee, WI

I am trying to find out the laws in Wisconsin for starting a job, then finding out it has unacceptable working conditions, questionable ethical practices,and I am suppose to have a vehicle, which I was never told ,can I quit and claim unemployment benefits again?

Attorney answers (1)

  1. Alan James Brinkmeier

    Contributor Level 20

    Answered . Unemployment insurance is a program that may provide you with money if you lose your job through no fault of your own. If you quit your job without meeting these requirements, you may be denied benefits because you will be considered to have voluntarily resigned your job. The pressures on the system are really high today because of the sheer volume of people in need of unemployment benefits. The unemployed are at a high number not seen for over 50 years.

    Because this matter is so important you should really get a lawyer.

    You might find my Legal Guide helpful "How to Choose A Lawyer For You"

    http://www.avvo.com/legal-guides/ugc/how-to-cho...

    You might find my Legal Guide helpful " What Do I Tell My Lawyer"

    http://www.avvo.com/legal-guides/ugc/what-do-i-...

    No one can know what the record is in the case because online we cannot see your documents. You need a lawyer. Check with a lawyer in your locale to discuss more of the details.

    Good luck to you.

    NOTE: This answer is made available by the out-of-state lawyer for educational purposes only. By using or participating in this site you understand that there is no attorney client privilege between you and the attorney responding. This site should not be used as a substitute for competent legal advice from a licensed professional attorney with whom you have established an attorney client relationship and all the privileges that relationship provides. The law changes frequently and varies from jurisdiction to jurisdiction. The information and materials provided are general in nature, and may not apply to a specific factual or legal circumstance described in the question.

Can't find what you're looking for? Ask a Lawyer

Get free answers from experienced attorneys.

 

Ask now

25,891 answers this week

2,776 attorneys answering

Ask a Lawyer

Get answers from top-rated lawyers.

  • It's FREE
  • It's easy
  • It's anonymous

25,891 answers this week

2,776 attorneys answering