Citizenship Application N400.

When USCIS issues citizenship certificates, do they use the name written on the N400 application or the name on the green card. My name on the green card was slightly wrong but I have written the correct name on the N400 application.

Paterson, NJ -

Attorney Answers (5)

L. Batya Schwartz Ehrens

L. Batya Schwartz Ehrens

Immigration Attorney - New York, NY
Answered

You have the opportunity to change your name on the N-400 application...

Dean P Murray

Dean P Murray

Immigration Attorney - Hoboken, NJ
Answered

You really ought to have brought this to their attention sooner. However, Naturalization presents an easy opportunity to correct the error.

IMPORTANT: Mr. Murray's response is NOT legal advice and does NOT create an attorney-client relationship. You... more
Jorge Luis Delgado

Jorge Luis Delgado

Immigration Attorney - Hollywood, FL
Answered

The day of the interview you can tell them what name you want to use. They will be curious as to why you have been using a green card with the wrong name for years. Be ready to explain or better yet, talk to an immigration now about the issue.

Theodore John Murphy

Theodore John Murphy

Immigration Attorney - West Chester, PA
Answered

USCIS will let you change your name in the naturalization process.

The answer provided here is general in nature and does not take into account other factors that may need to be... more
Kara Lien Roberts

Kara Lien Roberts

Immigration Attorney - Jacksonville, FL
Answered

There are two ways to fix your name: a name correction with evidence of the correct name OR a legal name change once you are sworn-in as a US Citizen. if the "slightly wrong" name on your green card is a misspelling or in the wrong order and you have proof of the correct spelling or name order (birth certificate, school records, etc.), then it is a name correction and just bring your evidence to your interview and explain to the officer. If the name on your green card is "slightly wrong" just as a matter of preference, then you would need a legal name change. All of this should be discussed at your interview. If you live in an area where all the ceremonies are at the Federal Court, then it does not matter which route you go and the name change would probably just be easier. If you live in an area where ceremonies are scheduled at the Federal Court and other places, then going the route of the legal name change might delay your swearing-in ceremony because you must be sworn-in before a judge when you are doing a legal name change and you would have to wait for a spot in a ceremony at the Federal Court.

Either way, do not worry to much about this. A lot can be explained/corrected at interview. Good luck!

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