Car Dealership Breach of contract and forgery of my signature

Asked over 1 year ago - Baltimore, MD

I leased 2013 RAV4 and the contract was:
I trade in 2012 tundra for $39000 and $26000 was to be paid off.
I was put 6000$ down payment and 7000$ back from the equity of trade in.
The general manager called today and said he will subtract $500 off from the check of $7000 and he will only pay off $25500 so I had to pay off $500
I was previous customer and they did not ask for any signature.
They just gave me papers inside of the envelope and when I checked, my signature that was previously used was all around the papers (I have new signature that is different) and I found out that they modified the lease agreement ( payment, tax, title, almost single things) was different when I requested copy of the lease document.
I found out everything was wrong from the internet and not sure what to do

Attorney answers (2)

  1. Philip Leon Marcus

    Contributor Level 16

    1

    Lawyer agrees

    Answered . There seem to be two things going on here, if I understand your narrative. One is a dispute over $500 and another is the apparent forging of your signature. What I would do is speak with the manager and tell him/her that they need to go back to the original deal, without the fake signatures because forgery is a bad thing, and they are risking their dealer license and jail. Say this VERY calmly and QUIETLY. Ask that they destroy the false agreement by shredding it in your presence, and then have you sign a new one that has the correct terms.

    If they refuse, call the MD State Police Licensing Division and say you want to make a complaint against this dealer—let the MSP carry the ball.

    Licensed in Maryland with offices in Maryland and Oregon. Information here is general, does not create a lawyer-... more
  2. Craig Meyers

    Contributor Level 12

    1

    Lawyer agrees

    Answered . Whatever you do, just make sure you do not threaten filing a criminal complaint for the purpose of furthering your civil matter. That is blackmail. Decide your plan of action, and act accordingly. If they make your deal right fine, if they don't fine, but don't blackmail them.

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