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Can your employer cut your hours the day of?

Fairfield, CA |

If you are scheduled X amount of hours for a shift can your employer send you home early without your ok the day of the shift?

Attorney Answers 3


Yes. However, if you show up for work and there isn't work, you may be entitled to "reporting time pay" in California.

Reporting time pay is partial compensation for employees who report to work expecting to work a specified number of hours and who are deprived of that amount because of inadequate scheduling or lack of proper notice by the employer.

For a complete explanation, see the California Department of Industrial Relations website at:

Frank W. Chen has been licensed to practice law in California since 1988. The information presented here is general in nature and is not intended, nor should be construed, as legal advice for a particular case. This posting does not create any attorney-client relationship with the author. For specific advice about your particular situation, please consult with your own attorney.

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Mr. Chen is correct. Reporting time pay is due to an employee who is scheduled to work and reports but is sent home.

Good luck to you.

This answer should not be construed to create any attorney-client relationship. Such a relationship can be formed only through the mutual execution of an attorney-client agreement. The answer given is based on the extremely limited facts provided and the proper course of action might change significantly with the introduction of other facts. All who read this answer should not rely on the answer to govern their conduct. Please seek the advice of competent counsel after disclosing all facts to that attorney. This answer is intended for California residents only. The answering party is only licensed to practice in the State of California.

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I agree with both lawyers.

I also wish to point out that the "reporting time claim" may be asserted when your employer requires you to respond to texts and emails after your work shift. I know this is not directly related to your question, but I do see this happening more frequently in the workplace.

Best regards,

David A. Mallen

David A. Mallen offers answers on Avvo for general information only. This offer of free, general answers is not intended to create an attorney-client relationship. If you need specific advice regarding your legal question, you should consult an attorney confidentially. Many experienced California labor and employment attorneys, including David A. Mallen offer no-risk legal consultations to employers and employees at no charge. David A. Mallen is licensed to practice law before all state and federal courts in California, as well as the California Labor Commissioner and the California Unemployment Insurance Appeals Board. Failure to take legal action within the time periods prescribed by law could result in the loss of important legal rights and remedies.

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