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Can u.s. citizenship be taken for retaining former citizenship

Atlanta, GA |

My father naturalized in the United states. However, he never sent in a formal renounciation of citizenship to his former country. After becoming a u.s. citizen he owned property in his former country under his former citizenship. The state department has been made aware of this and I am wondering if they can take away his u.s. citizenship. The country in question allows dual citizenship but my father never got the card and the dual citizen ship came after he acquired his property. Can the state department say that because he never formally renounced his citizenship and maintained his former citizenship after naturalizing his u.s. citizenship is void.

Attorney Answers 4


  1. Whether he retained his former citizenship is a question of the law of that country.

    J Charles Ferrari Eng & Nishimura 213.622.2255 The statement above is general in nature and does not constitute legal advice, as not all the facts are known. You should retain an attorney to review all the facts specific to your case in order to receive advise specific to your case. The statement above does not create an attorney/client relationship. Answers on Avvo can only be general ones, as specific answers would require knowledge of all the facts. As such, they may or may not apply to the question.


  2. The United States recognizes dual citizenship. There is no requirement that a naturalized citizen renounce and terminate his/her former citizenship. There is no special "card" issued by the U.S. to formalize dual citizenship. A U.S. citizen may acquire or continue to own property in another country.

    [Note: Consistent with Avvo policy, this communication is intended as general information and not specific legal advice, and this communication does not create an attorney-client relationship.]

    David N. Soloway
    Frazier, Soloway & Kennedy, P.C.
    1800 Century Place, Suite 100
    Atlanta, Georgia 30345 www.fspklaw.com
    404-320-7000 * 1-877-232-5352 * dsoloway@fspklaw.com

    [Note: Consistent with Avvo policy, this communication is intended as general information and not specific legal advice, and this communication does not create an attorney-client relationship.] David N. Soloway Frazier, Soloway & Poorak, P.C. 1800 Century Place, Suite 100 Atlanta, Georgia 30345 www.fspklaw.com 404-320-7000 * 1-877-232-5352 * dsoloway@fspklaw.com


  3. The U.S. government does not require an alien to relinquish foreign citizenship when he/she naturalizes. Whether the foreign country considers your father to have abandoned his residence is controlled by that country's laws.

    Wendy R. Barlow, Esq, The Law Offices of Grinberg & Segal, P.L.L.C., 111 Broadway, Suite 1306, New York NY 10006, (866) 456-­8654, wendy@myatorneyusa.com, www.myattorneyusa.com. The information contained in this answer is provided for informational purposes only, and should not be construed as legal advice on any subject matter. No recipients of content from this answer, clients or otherwise, should act or refrain from acting on the basis of any content included in the answer without seeking the appropriate legal or other professional advice on the particular facts and circumstances at issue from a licensed attorney. Provision of information on this website does not create an attorney-client relationship between you and The Law Offices of Grinberg & Segal, P.L.L.C., nor is it intended to do so.


  4. This depends on the law of his former country.

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