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Can my law practice operate as a dba of my California sub s corp?

Los Angeles, CA |
Filed under: S-corporation Business

I operate now as a sole proprietor under my own name.

Attorney Answers 3

Posted

Yes. Make sure you notify your malpractice carrier of any changes you make. Good luck.

The above is general legal and business analysis. It is not "legal advice" but analysis, and different lawyers may analyse this matter differently, especially if there are additional facts not reflected in the question. I am not your attorney until retained by a written retainer agreement signed by both of us. I am only licensed in California. See also avvo.com terms and conditions item 9, incorporated as if it was reprinted here.

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Posted

I agree with attorney Doland and you may also check with SBC to make sure if there any updating or reporting requirement regarding the dba of the corporation which would be engaged in the practice of law, I think it needs to be a professional corp. whether "s" or not. Good luck.

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Michael Charles Doland

Michael Charles Doland

Posted

The state bar site that addresses this is http://www.calbar.ca.gov/Attorneys/MemberServices/LawCorporations.aspx

Posted

You can only operate a law practice as a professional corporation (which can be taxed as a C or S corporation), a flexible purpose corporation, a public benefit corporation or a nonprofit corporation. As far as the fictitious business name, you will need to register the corporation with the State Bar if you use a name that is something other than your actual name.

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