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Can my employer change my schedule or reduce me hours?

Miami, FL |

HI, because of not putting a suitable person, and try to do it themselves, changed fuse electricity, which subsequently caused a fire which was put at risk my life.I work 8-5pm, now they want to i work from 3- 11pm, otherwise I would reduce the hours. Is this legal? What I can do?

Attorney Answers 3


  1. Well if you believe and have evidence to show that they are reducing your hours because you reported their illegal conduct with the fuses, you may have a claim for retaliation. If your hours are being reduced because there was a fire and the facility isn't open as long then no, you have no claim. Normally an employer can adjust the hours and schedules of all their employees, unless there is a written contract or a collective bargaining agreement that limits the employer's options. You should talk to an employment lawyer and provide them with the details. You can find one here on AVvo or by calling the local bar.
    Best of luck.

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  2. Be aware that there are very, very short and very strict statutes of limitations (rules that prevent you from bringing a claim) if your employer takes action against you because of whistle blower activity related to unsafe workplace behavior (reporting an OSHA violation or participating in an OSHA investigation). That period can be as short as 30 days to take action. If you are in doubt about your rights, see an attorney as soon as possible, or you may lose your ability to protect your rights entirely.

    Any responses are based on the questioner's recitation of the facts solely. To the extent the facts differ from those as recited by the questioner, the proper response can vary greatly. Providing a response to a forum or message board question does not establish an attorney-client relationship and responses are provided for information purposes and should not be used as a substitute for the advice of an attorney that has been provided full facts and information regarding the request.


  3. Let me start by saying that the other two lawyers probably did a better job translating what you intended to say than I would have done. I am really not sure, even after reading this more than once.

    With that said, I am not sure that I agree with the others that you have a possible whistleblower claim (assuming I understand more or less what you are saying). You have to be complaining about a policy of the employer that violates a law, rule, or regulation in order to possibly implicate such law. I am not sure I see anything of the sort occurring here, but I honestly am not sure what exactly you are trying to convey.

    Make an appointment to see a qualified employment lawyer in your area in person to discuss this in more detail. I am going to go out on a limb here, but I am fairly certain this story would make a lot more sense in person that it does on this online forum. Good luck.

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