Can I travel after N-400 interview?

Asked almost 2 years ago - Tucson, AZ

I had my N-400 interview last week. I signed a paper at the end and the officer told me that she wanted to review my application again since it was very thick. I do not know when I will be notified about the result of my interview. I do not think that it will be denied. I would like to go back home to see my parents and stay there for about 2 months. Is it wise? Lets say they would deny my N-400 application for some unknown reasons to me. Are they going to revoke my green card immediately or I would be notified to appeal for green card/N-400 and I would be able to come back to the US to defend myself? What's the risk of not readmitting to the US if they deny my N-400 and revoke my green card?I have not done anything wrong but I am thinking about the worse possibilities.

Attorney answers (3)

  1. Dhenu Mitesh Savla

    Pro

    Contributor Level 18

    1

    Lawyer agrees

    Answered . Risks are different for each case. We cannot answer such questions hypothetically.


    Dhenu Savla, Esq.
    SwagatUSA, LLC
    www.swagatusa.com/attorney

    This answer does not create an attorney-client relationship and is not meant to be relied upon as legal advice.
  2. J. Thomas Smith Ph.D.

    Pro

    Contributor Level 20

    Answered . Do consult an experienced immigration attorney for specific information on your case. Good luck.

    Law Offices of J Thomas Smith J.D., Ph.D 11500 Northwest Freeway, Suite 280 Houston, TX 77092 713-LAWYER-2 www.... more
  3. J Charles Ferrari

    Contributor Level 20

    Answered . No, it is not wise. Doing so could result in you missing a swearing in ceremony, or worse getting the N-400 denied because USCIS requested information.

    J Charles Ferrari Eng & Nishimura 213.622.2255 The statement above is general in nature and does not... more

Related Topics

Immigration

If you want to visit or move permanently to the US, you'll want to learn about your different immigration options.

US citizenship

In order to become US citizens and enjoy the benefits that citizenship grants, immigrants must go through the naturalization process.

Can't find what you're looking for? Ask a Lawyer

Get free answers from experienced attorneys.

 

Ask now

31,052 answers this week

3,467 attorneys answering

Ask a Lawyer

Get answers from top-rated lawyers.

  • It's FREE
  • It's easy
  • It's anonymous

31,052 answers this week

3,467 attorneys answering