Can I take Google to Small Claims Court to uncover the name of the person who wrote a slanderous and abusive review ?

Asked almost 5 years ago - San Diego, CA

the review: this place is a HELL HOLE
Sooo The SERVICE there sucks and there technician is an ahole! they only have one tech and they expect to get done in 15 min!! that a crook of bs!! he also llets his daughter and wife work the machines and they r not certified techs!!AGAINST THE LAW!!!! They drink beer while they r working! I have seen the owner walk out of the shop with a beer!! PRICE is outrageous!!! this place sucks!!! very lousy service! and the girl that works the front counter is a felon! DONT GO THERE!!! and also the owner and his wife are druggies!!!!

Attorney answers (2)

  1. Zachary James Levine

    Pro

    Contributor Level 10

    Answered . Small claims is for money damages, you won't be able to discover the identity of a Google user through that process. Additionally, Google is very protective of its users' identities and almost always requires a court order to turn over such information.

    You should contact an attorney if you are seriously considering proceeding with this matter who will be able to advise you about filing a petition for pre-action discovery. Through this petition you can uncover the identity of the poster if you can establish to the court that you have a meritorious cause of action and the information you're seeking is necessary to bring that action.

    The above answer is not "legal advice" as specified under any pertinent rules governing the Professional Responsibilities of Lawyers and should not be relied upon. An attorney-client relationship has not been established by virtue of this correspondence. Legal issues are often complex and involve local laws and facts which may not be effectively communicated without a complete consultation.

  2. Donald A Green

    Contributor Level 12

    Answered . I agree with the previous responses. This is serious libel / slander and you should consider talking to an attorney about pursuing this case. A major consideration is damages: can you prove that your establishment has been damaged (e.g. lost clientele / customer base, profits, etc.) I would only recommend pursuing this beyond small claims if it makes economic sense.

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