CAN I SUEMY OMPANY FOR RACIAL DISCRIMINATION IN EMPLOYMENT.

Asked 8 months ago - Saint Louis, MO

COMPANY hire me, I grew up rapidly in my carrer, suddenly coworkers star giving me cold shoulder, and did not talk to me, I was not giving the opportunity to grow,COMPANY help other employees to be relocated but me. I FEEL STRES then went to counselor help. now they fire me and still not now the details of my firing

Attorney answers (3)

  1. Ronald Jay Eisenberg

    Contributor Level 13

    1

    Lawyer agrees

    Answered . You must first file a charge of discrimination and get a right to sue letter from the EEOC. You'll have to show facts constituting discrimination, however.

    My comments are general in nature, are not legal advice as to your specific issue, and do not establish an... more
  2. Christopher Lee Kalberg

    Pro

    Contributor Level 11

    1

    Lawyer agrees

    Answered . Your going to need facts that actually demonstrate discrimination based upon race. In any event however, you cannot sue your former employer until you have, "exhausted your administrative remedied" and received a right to sue letter from the EEOC or Mo. Commission.

    Chris Kalberg, Kalberg Law Office, L.L.C. (913) 825-6670, kalberglaw@everestkc.net No attorney client... more
  3. Joseph Charles Shoemaker

    Contributor Level 8

    1

    Lawyer agrees

    Answered . Assuming that race had anything to do with your termination (which is not mentioned in your facts), then you may, at a later date, possibly file suit.

    As the other attorney noted, the first step would be to file a charge of discrimination with either the EEOC or state agency.

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