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Can I sue my psychiatrist for malpractice?

Saint Louis, MO |
Filed under: Medical malpractice

I had been seeing a psychiatrist for the better part of last year while pregnant and all the way up till the end of Jan 2010. I was seeing him for major depression and bi-polar disorder (which I have suffered from for about 10 years). At each appointment (roughly every two weeks) I was ALWAYS given more prescriptions for meds. I was a walking zombie and I could not take care of myself. On my last visit he was laughing, making rude comments, and yelled at me because my ex-employers insurrance company for long-term disability wanted info on my condition. He said I was costing him money by filling out such forms. Bottom line, he said there was nothing wrong with me and it cost me my L/T Disability, yet he gave me a SET of meds that same day. Can I sue him?

Attorney Answers 3


  1. It seems to me you have a few issues to look at. I am unsure from your information whether you could file a lawsuit. To file such a suit, you will need to prove not only negligence but that it caused you significant harm. I suggest you start with a second opinion to figure out what, if any, diagnosis you actually have. Then, seek whatever the best treatment option is available to you from there. You will then be able to assess the extent you have suffered harm from what the first psych did or failed to do. As there are time deadlines involved with filing suit, I suggest you retain an MO attorney as soon as you can to help with your evaluation. Good luck to you.


  2. Good advise regarding always checking with state counsel prior to action. One thought occurs: Put the malpractice issues aside for just a moment, what you decribe amounts to deliberate and intentional fraud if you can prove he said it. Such matters are ripe for reportingto the state medical board and the insurance company. There will certainly be "harm" to you incosts, expenses, time, concern and false inducement to continue treatment. If any of these agencies agree with you, the odds of finding an expert and competent local counsel will certainly increase.


  3. Good advise regarding always checking with state counsel prior to action. One thought occurs: Put the malpractice issues aside for just a moment, what you decribe amounts to deliberate and intentional fraud if you can prove he said it. Such matters are ripe for reportingto the state medical board and the insurance company. There will certainly be "harm" to you incosts, expenses, time, concern and false inducement to continue treatment. If any of these agencies agree with you, the odds of finding an expert and competent local counsel will certainly increase.

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