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Can I sue my coworker for defamation of character?

Orlando, FL |

My coworker wants to get me fired. She tried to make this happen by telling management that I pushed her, which I did not. She is always making up little stories about me and telling anyone that will listen. This has put my job in jeopardy.

Attorney Answers 5


  1. Sit down with somebody in HR and file your own report refuting her report. But no, I don't see defamation here at all, and I predict that no lawyer will take this as a defamation case. A practical solution would be to stay away from her. When you see her coming, find another way to walk. Over time, she will get tired of acting like an 8 year old. Good luck!

    If you think my response is the best response, it would help me if you would indicate that. Also, please note that my responses to question(s) are NOT legal advice from me to you because I am NOT your lawyer, you are NOT my client, and we do NOT currently have an attorney-client relationship. Thanks!


  2. Document everything, get witnesses, get statements. If you suffer economic harm because of it, get an attorney immediately. Good luck.

    The above is general information only and is not legal advice. The information provided does not form an attorney-client relationship, and should not be relied upon to take or refrain from taking any action. I am not your attorney until we sign a retainer agreement.


  3. Schedule a sit-down meeting with HR to discuss.


  4. Sure, this is technically slander. But, no lawyer will take the case on a contingent fee basis because your damages are tiny at this time. Someone might take it on an hourly basis, but you will be wasting thousands of dollars.

    This is a summary based on incomplete facts. You should not rely on it as legal advise. No attorney-client relationship is intended to be formed. You may call me 772-562-4570; email me vblawyer@bellsouth.net, or visit my website http://www.millerlawoffices.us


  5. Lawyer answer: Could be slander, could be tortious interference with a contract. You would have to demonstrate that you had actually been harmed, and it would likely not be a case anyone would take on a contingency.

    Practical answer: Talk to your HR department or your boss. Stay calm and be honest about what has happened.

    My response to this question does not mean I agree to represent you in any proceedings. This information is also not subject to attorney-client privilege.

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