Can I sue former employer for laying me off in 2009. It is the largest consumer products company in the U.S.

Asked over 1 year ago - Oxnard, CA

Is there a statute of limitations for suing for PTSD?

Attorney answers (4)

  1. George Ellis Corson IV

    Contributor Level 20

    6

    Lawyers agree

    1

    Answered . Laying you off is not a valid reason to sue your employer. Discrimination for having a disability may be, but 4 years of delay probably exceeds the statute of limitations for all known remedies.

    We offer general concepts, but you should give ALL your facts to a licensed Attorney in your state before you RELY... more
  2. Marilynn Mika Spencer

    Contributor Level 20

    6

    Lawyers agree

    Answered . In California, the statute of limitation for wrongful termination in violation of public policy is two years. The statute of limitation for filing a claim of disability discrimination with the California Department of Fair Employment and Housing is one year. The statute of limitation for filing a workers' compensation claim is one year, but there are earlier reporting deadlines.

    twitter.com/MikaSpencer *** All legal actions have time limits, called statutes of limitation. If you miss the... more
  3. Frank Wei-Hong Chen

    Contributor Level 20

    5

    Lawyers agree

    Answered . No, not likely. Yes there is. In California, the statute of limitations generally applicable to workers compensation claims is one year.

    Frank W. Chen has been licensed to practice law in California since 1988. The information presented here is... more
  4. Patrick John Phillips

    Contributor Level 17

    1

    Lawyer agrees

    Answered . I cannot think of any cause of action or legal theory that would permit a lawsuit for wrongful termination filed four years after termination to proceed. Moreover, it seems questionable as to whether any cause of action for wrongful termination exists in the first place, as employers generally enjoy vast discretion to terminate employees for just about any non-discriminatory reason, regardless of whether the basis is fair or reasonable.

    This answer is a general interpretation of the law and is not fact specific to your case. Likewise it does not... more

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