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Can I print out a work email and use it against my employer in an unemployment hearing in New York?

Merrick, NY |

I am trying to receive unemployment - aside from my the president of my company physically threatening me, he sent me an email which stated that I was not to deal with any Indians (meaning middle eastern people) at my job. I also had another manager, in front of witnesses including my human resources representative, say that we don't want Indian people as customers to me. Of course this is blatant discrmination. My question is, can I print the email my boss sent to me at my job and include it if I have to go to a hearing?

Attorney Answers 5

Posted

Yes. The Administrative Law Judge will decide whether it is relevent and admissible.

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Absolutely.

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Posted

Yes. It's proof of a communication. While there may be restrictions against this in an employee handbook or otherwise, even the restriction would likely be unlawful. Even without the printed copy of the email, you can credibly testify to what you received by email.

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Posted

You need to bring that email to an experienced employment attorney immediately.

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Posted

Furthermore, if you feel you were wrongfully terminated on the basis of your own race, gender, nationality, etc..., you should file a complaint with the EEOC and send the email to them as well. Since, according to you, this president threatened you with physical force and discriminates against customers based on their place of origin, he most likely creates a hostile work environment. You might consider seeking more than mere unemployment benefits.

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