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Can I post bail right after my preliminary hearing? Does the magistrate have a bail bondsman?

Wrightsville, PA |

I have a preliminary hearing on Thursday and at that hearing the judge will set bail. It is for an alleged felony retail theft, $33. We will only have about $500 cash on us. Will my husband have to find a bondsman afterward or is there one at the magistrate? He starts work at 7 pm and I don't want to spend any time in jail. Advice?

Thank you for the information. I do have a lawyer and I am not very happy with them, after this hearing I will be looking for a different one to help with the next step. I am being charged with a felony because they are saying 2 charges I have from 1998 are retail thefts. In fact they are not, they are theft by unlawful taking, but I guess I have to prove that at a later time since my lawyer tells me the prelim is just to determine if there is enough evidence to move forward and set bail.

Attorney Answers 5

Posted

First take a deep breath. It is not likely that the Magesterial District Justice will set a monetary bail for you for such a small offense. Its not a guarantee but I don't think its likely. Frankely I think your $500 would be better spent on hiring counsel to advise you and represent you. If you can't afford counsel go to the public defenders office ASAP. To answer your initial question more directly, yes you can pay bail a the District Court office right after the hearing.

This information does not create an attorney /client relationship and should not be use or relied upon to make any decision in your case. Only consultation with your own attorney can provide you with the advice you need for your case.

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Posted

I agree with Mr. Zucker's assessment of the case. The focus should be on securing an experienced criminal defense attorney. Good luck.

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Posted

Whether monetary, secured bail will be set depends on various factors. If you've been charged with a felony retail theft and the items were only worth $33, then you've obviously got a bit of a criminal record. Generally, unless you've got a history of failing to appear in court or a particularly zealous MDJ, you are likely to get unsecured bail, meaning you won't have to pay anything now, but will if you fail to show up in the future.

If things go badly and a bondsman is required you can ask for a list from the MDJ. Most have that information on hand. There will not be a bondsman right at the MDJ's office.

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Asker

Posted

Thank you very much. I am being charged with a felony because they are saying 2 charges I have from 1998 are retail thefts. In fact they are not, they are theft by unlawful taking, but I guess I have to prove that at a later time since my lawyer tells me the prelim is just to determine if there is enough evidence to move forward and set bail.

Posted

I believe this is a repeat question. Again, it is entirely possible to get charges adjusted at the preliminary hearing, but you're going to need the assistance of an attorney to help with this. As before, I do handle cases in York County and would be willing to represent your husband.

This answer does not constitute legal advice and does not establish an attorney-client relationship.

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Asker

Posted

Hi Ryan. The charges are actually against me, not my husband. I think since I already paid my lawyer I'm going to use them just for the prelim so I have my cash to bail myself out of jail if need be. I am pretty sure I will be hiring a new one to handle my case from there on out though. They do not communicate with me and that's what is really upsetting to me.

Ryan Michael Davidson

Ryan Michael Davidson

Posted

I am available to discuss at your convenience. Feel free to give me a call.

Posted

Retain a private criminal defense attorney for the preliminary hearing on Thursday. Good luck.

This response is for informational purposes only and does not constitute legal advice. The response is intended, but not promised or guaranteed to be current, complete, or up-to-date. Transmission of the information is not intended to create, and the receipt does not constitute, an attorney-client relationship between Mark D. Copoulos, Esquire and any party. The responses provided on this website are offered only for general informational and educational purposes. They are not offered as and do not constitute legal advice or legal opinions. You should not act or rely on any information contained in these responses without first seeking the advice of an attorney.

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