Can i legally fight for visitation of my 14 year old granddaughter

Asked over 2 years ago - 06066

I was at her birth and had been instrumental in her early years. My daughter got remarried and new husband adopted her. For some reason after I helped them out financially and with material things, they stopped communicating with me; bad mouthed me to other people and have refused to talk to me. I have a feeling that they tried to poison me in her eyes. Can i legally pursue visitation

Additional information

WE ALL LIVE IN CONNECTICUT

Before the communication had stopped, my granddaughter had a tough emotional upbringing. Last I saw her, I was picking her up from a counseling facility and transporting her to her aunt's house since her mother (my daughter) slapped her & child was temporarily removed from home. It was from that point that communcation stopped. I had to find out from others that she had been placed in a residential treatment facility; and as of a couple of months ago is living at home. She & I had a close relationship prior to all this.

Attorney answers (2)

  1. Gregory A Allen

    Pro

    Contributor Level 11

    Answered . Yes, you can seek visitation. Connecticut allows grandparents to seek visitation of their grandchildren. Here is a link to a Connecticut publication on grandparents rights:

    http://www.jud.ct.gov/lawlib/Notebooks/Pathfind...

    The publication has a lot of helpful information. This is a process you can do on your own. However, family court can become a bit complicated, especially if your child and her husband fight you on the issue. You may want to consider consulting a family lawyer.

  2. Christian Matthew Denmon

    Pro

    Contributor Level 8

    Answered . Unfortunately, grandparents do not have any rights to visitation in Florida courts. You would not have legal "standing" to seek visitation with your grand-daughter.

    There is a strong movement by grandparents across the State to change the law. If this is something you felt strongly about, I would recommend discussing this with your legislature.

    In the meantime, I am afraid your option for the next four years is to bit the bullet and play nice with your daughter.

    When your granddaughter is 18, she will have the ability to make her own decisions.

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