Can I have someone review my dissolution of marriage paperwork for accuracy but still represent myself?

Asked 12 months ago - Phoenix, AZ

My husband and I agree to child support, debt distribution and all property. We want this to be very amicable and want to do this ourselves. I am getting advice to have a lawyer review the documents b/c "that is just not done on your own".

Attorney answers (3)

  1. Deborah Varney

    Contributor Level 10

    3

    Lawyers agree

    Answered . You should call an attorney to set up a consultation. Many attorneys, such as our office, offer a free 30 minute initial consultation. During the consultation, the attorney will be able to review any pleadings you have prepared and answer any questions that you have. It would be advisable for each of you to go to your own attorney and review it individually. Good luck!

  2. Patrick S Sampair

    Pro

    Contributor Level 16

    3

    Lawyers agree

    Answered . You absolutely should have a lawyer review your paperwork. Often it is not the agreement between the parties that causes a problem but how they express that agreement in their divorce paperwork. Divorce law is complicated at times particularly where there are retirement accounts, property held in both names and in some cases support issues. Often people believe that the lawyers are the problem not the solution. A good divorce lawyer is not there to complicate your lives but to simplify it. Just as you would not build a house without a good set of plans drawn by a professional, you should not attempt to divide your most important assets without the proper paperwork. The Divorce Decree is just like the plan to build the house. Without a proper Decree every lawyer in this space would agree that you are putting your assets at risk and at least have the possibility of having to pay much more money later to fix problems that you had no idea existed.

    Information provided on this site does not constitute legal advice. Answers posted here are based on a very... more
  3. Dean George Tsourakis

    Pro

    Contributor Level 20

    2

    Lawyers agree

    Answered . Yes, you can. I wouldn't do it because there is no way that I could tell that it is fair without having spent a long time viewing assets and liabilities.

Related Topics

Divorce

Divorce is the process of formally ending a marriage. Divorces may be jointly agreed upon, resolved by negotiation, or decided in court.

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