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Can I face serious criminal charges?

New York, NY |

"Hydro" refers to our electric bill
If my room-mate did not want to pay for his half of this months hydro bill and I used his credit card to pay for his portion, can he sue me? We got into a fight and he thinks I owe him money because he's taking back a gift he gave to me last year. This is what sparked his wanting me to pay the electric bill all myself. Many times in the past he has let me use his card to make payments for him because he is lazy. This time I did not have explicit consent but I used his credit card to pay for his portion of the hydro. His portion of the bill is 50% but I made the charge equal to 40% of the balance (I paid the rest). Now he is saying if I don't pay him back the $2800 he gave me last year, he's going to sue me for the $200 charged on his card by me.

Attorney Answers 3

Posted

You cannot use someone's credit card without their permission. Not only can you be sued by the credit card holder, but you can also be criminally prosecuted for identity theft and fraud.

The information provided herein is general information only and not legal advice. The information provided herein does not create an attorney client relationship and is not a substitute for having a consultation with an attorney. It is important to have a consultation with an attorney as the information provided in this forum is limited and cannot possibly cover all potential issues in a given situation.

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Posted

You can be charged with a variety of felonies.

The above answer, and any follow up comments or emails is for informational purposes only and not meant as legal advice.

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Posted

I agree with the other attorneys' answers.

The legal analysis of any situation depends on a variety of factors which cannot be properly represented or accounted for in a response to an on-line question. Any answer, discussion or information is intended as general information only, is not intended to serve as legal advice or as a substitute for legal counsel, and should not be relied upon in making any decision. If you have a question about a specific factual situation, you should contact an attorney directly.

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