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Can i change my plea before sentencing

Chillicothe, OH |

pled guilty to a charge i did not commit. If i testify the way they want me to no jail.if i dont jail. im not guilty of anything. i want to change my plea to not guilty,and take my chances.

Attorney Answers 3


  1. It is possible to withdraw your guilty plea. In fact, you have a much greater chance of the judge allowing you to withdraw your plea before your sentencing than you would after your sentencing. Ultimately, however, it is up to the judge whether he will allow it or not. You should talk over your options with your attorney. The last thing you want to do is annoy your judge or the prosecutor just before your sentencing.

    @BangerterLaw


  2. Possibly but you have to file a motion to withdraw your plea. These are very difficult. I see that you have posted many questions. The answer to all of them is either talk to your attorney and if you are not satisfied with your attorney you need to hire a new one asap.

    Attorney Chris Beck
    Beck Law Office, L.L.C.
    Beavercreek, Ohio
    (937)510-6110 phone
    attycbeck@gmail.com
    www.becklawofficellc.com

    The responses of Attorney Chris Beck to any questions posed on Avvo do NOT establish an Attorney-client relationship. Attorney Beck is available for private hire and consultation for a fee. Only after Attorney Beck is retained as counsel, or agrees to discuss this matter with you privately, shall he be legally deemed to be your Attorney. His responses herein are an attempt to assist persons temporarily based upon the very extremely limited amount of information provided by the questioner


  3. Possibly, yes. If you are able to withdraw your plea, however, all deals will likely be off, and you'll have to roll the dice with going to trial. Ultimately, it's up to the judge whether to allow you to change your plea.

    The responses of Attorney Benjamin Partee to any questions posed on Avvo do NOT establish an Attorney-Client relationship. Attorney Partee is available for private hire and consultation for a fee. Only after Attorney Partee is retained as counsel, or agrees to discuss this matter with you privately, shall he be legally deemed to be your Attorney. His responses herein are an attempt to assist persons temporarily based upon the very extremely limited amount of information provided by the asker.