Can I be forced to pay for activities that I can't afford?

Asked over 4 years ago - Everett, WA

In my order of childsupport my ex-wife and I each pay our proportional share of our 2 daughters extra-curricular activites and educational expenses. My share is 69.8% and hers is 30.2%. Recently my daughters have been talking about joining "premier soccer" in their soccer club. I looked it up on their soccer clubs website and the cost is around $2500.00 a year, instead of around $140.00 annually for the regular soccer team. My exwife has also been telling them she is going to sign them up to attend a private school. I am worried because their is no cap or limit on how much she can ask me to pay because I gave her sole decision making to avoid going to trial. Can I file a motion to clarify exactly how much she is allowed to spend? Will a judge grant a limit?

Attorney answers (1)

  1. Thuong-Tri Nguyen

    Contributor Level 20

    Answered . I doubt that one parent having "sole decision making" necessarily means the other parent has to pay for "premier soccer" or private school. You should review your court orders to see what the current orders require you to do.

    If your financial circumstances have changed or the current orders are not clear, you can ask the court to take another look. There may be other bases to file the petition.

    "Premier soccer" or private school is generally not a necessity of life. Unless the parents can afford the activities and the children's lifestyle had included such activities before the divorce, the court likely would not require a financially strapped parent to pay for such activities.

    You should review your specific facts with your attorney to see what legal options are available.

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