Can I avoid deportation by being stateless? Can a lawyer help my case?

Asked 4 months ago - Atlanta, GA

I married a us citizen in 2008 back in my country, came to USA in 2010 and realized that he's not who he said he was, and we couldn't get along at all , I suffered so much emotional and physical abuse in his hand but never went to the police or any evidence to show for it, when I filed I 751 in 2012, I asked for a waiver as an abused spouse, extreme hardship. Now I went for my interview and the immigration officer told me that I don't have enough evidence to support my claim of abuse. Well she stamped my passport for 3 month and said I will hear from them in that time frame, my fear is if I get denied and in removal proceeding can I claim statelessness to avoid deportation cos I have two kids that I don't wanna take back to my country yet.Don't have a lawyer yet.Just thinking some idea

Attorney answers (3)

  1. Giacomo Jacques Behar

    Pro

    Contributor Level 20

    3

    Lawyers agree

    Best Answer
    chosen by asker

    Answered . Will be an expensive, uphill battle, outcome uncertain, but without a highly experienced lawyer on your side you have no chance whatsoever.

    Kindly be advised that the answer above is only general in nature cannot be construed as legal advice, given that... more
  2. Anna Tsibel Moreas

    Contributor Level 13

    3

    Lawyers agree

    1

    Answered . You need to find an immigration attorney quickly. It seems like you will be placed into deportation proceedings, and you need a lawyer to represent you in the immigration court.

    DISCLAIMER: The information appearing here is for general informational purposes only and is not intended to... more
  3. Gunda Johanna Brost

    Pro

    Contributor Level 20

    Answered . I would carefully venture to say that being stateless would help your case insofar as it would make it difficult for ICE to effectuate your physical removal. But, not much is impossible for ICE. I agree therefore with my esteemed colleagues' advice that you should hire an immigration attorney. Who knows, perhaps that person will be able to find some type of immigration relief you didn't know you could qualify for.

    Gunda J. Brost Brost Law Office This advice does not form an attorney-client relationship and is merely... more

Can't find what you're looking for? Ask a Lawyer

Get free answers from experienced attorneys.

 

Ask now

30,609 answers this week

3,205 attorneys answering

Ask a Lawyer

Get answers from top-rated lawyers.

  • It's FREE
  • It's easy
  • It's anonymous

30,609 answers this week

3,205 attorneys answering