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Can anyone tell me about the buyer's remorse law in Washington State? Or where I would look for the information, in the RCW's?

Spokane, WA |
Filed under: Lemon law

I am particularly interested in what areas/situations this law applies.

Attorney Answers 2


  1. The Office of the Attorney General for WA has a lot free information for consumers. You can start by looking at: http://www.atg.wa.gov/ConsumerIssues/CancellationRights.aspx .

    In general, there is no "buyer's remorse law". Except for transactions specifically provided by law, when considerations change hands, there likely is a binding agreement.

    You can review your specific facts with your attorney to find out your legal options.


  2. I don’t know of any state that has a “buyer’s remorse” law. However, every state has a Udap law that makes it illegal for a merchant or business to do something that is unfair or deceptive in dealing with a consumer and those laws generally give the buyer the option to cancel a sale under many circumstances. Also there are special laws that deal with specific kinds of sales too, such as motor vehicles, spa memberships, etc., and the consumer protection laws in your state may give you additional legal rights too. Every state also has laws that make it illegal for a merchant to commit fraud on a consumer too. But the law is different in every state. You need to talk to a local Consumer Law attorney who deals with this kind of case. Call your local attorney's Bar Association and ask for a referral to a Consumer Law attorney near you or you can go to this web site page for a Free Online 50 State National List of Consumer Law Lawyers (http://www.ohiolemonlaw.com/ocll-site/ocll-locate_local.shtml) and find one near you (lawyers don’t pay to get listed here and most of them are members of the only national association for Consumer Law lawyers, NACA.net). But act quickly because for every legal right you have, there is only a limited amount of time to actually file a lawsuit in court or your rights expire (it's called the statute of limitations), so don't waste your time getting to a Consumer Law attorney and finding out what your rights are. If this answer was helpful, please give a “Vote Up” review below. Thanks. Ron Burdge, www.OhioConsumerLaw.com, www.CarSalesFraud.com, www.BurdgeLaw.com

    This answer is for general purposes only and does not establish an attorney-client relationship. Click the link to find a Consumer Law attorney near you.

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