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Can a Trustee be Under Agreement (U/A) with a trust ?

Manteca, CA |

ex. John Doe Living Trust U/A 12/12/2012 Jack Doe Trustee For The Benefit of Jim Doe

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Attorney Answers 3

Posted

Not sure what your question is. What its seems like is that John Doe created a trust for the benefit of Jim Doe and named Jack Doe as trustee of that trust. That is perfectly fine if that is in fact the case.

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Asker

Posted

well, I am trying to be specific. that is, John Doe Trust not John Doe. Can a TRUST be U/A with a trustee for the benefit of another trust or person. sorry if this is not clear also. I do appreciate your replies. Thank you in advance

Posted

I agree that your question is not entirely clear. U/A is a common abbreviation used when referring to a trust agreement. If Jack Doe is acting as Trustee of the John Doe Living Trust, then the above caption would appear to be fine.

James Frederick

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Charles Adam Shultz

Charles Adam Shultz

Posted

I California we usually see U/T/A - Under Trust Agreement or U/D/T Under Declaration of Trust - but as Mr. Frederick said, U/A is fine too.

James P. Frederick

James P. Frederick

Posted

We usually see U/T/A as well.

Charles Adam Shultz

Charles Adam Shultz

Posted

To further clarify, since we are bantering TYPE A individuals, U/T/A, U/T/D, U/A or whatever else you use are not legal abbreviation per say. They are essentially created for convenience and universally recognized by estate planning attorneys so you dont have to write out the full words.

James P. Frederick

James P. Frederick

Posted

Very true. Not sure that either one of us are Type A, though. I prefer "detail oriented!" ;-)

Posted

Yes, U/A is a short hand (and common) way of saying the John Dow Living Trust under the trust agreement executed on 12/12/2002.

Many times financial institutions will use this method to name counts owned by trusts

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Asker

Posted

Hi, ,did you mean "accounts" owned by a trust? thank you.

Dagmar Pollex

Dagmar Pollex

Posted

yes- I meant to say accounts - not "counts"

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