Can a person speak with a judge without his or her attorney present to help resolve a criminal case?

Asked over 1 year ago - Hesperia, CA

To help the judge better understand the concerns of how the defendant has been denied a previous ruling from another judge concerning the defense attorney's lack of involvement in that case.

Attorney answers (7)

  1. David Aaron Wiesen

    Pro

    Contributor Level 13

    6

    Lawyers agree

    1

    Answered . No. A person can request to speak with the Judge but there will be a clerk, a deputy, a court reporter and the defense counsel present. A person will get a chance to share the information pertaining to the "attorney's lack of involvement in that case" and the Judge will seek input from the attorney and then make a ruling.

    Postings provided on this forum are informal and do not establish an attorney client relationship. To discuss... more
  2. Robert Laurens Driessen

    Contributor Level 20

    6

    Lawyers agree

    Answered . No.
    Robert Driessen

    Mr. Driessen is a former Deputy DA in Orange County with over 8 years of criminal law experience. Nothing stated... more
  3. Brian Russell Michaels

    Pro

    Contributor Level 16

    6

    Lawyers agree

    Answered . no

  4. Joseph Salvatore Farina

    Contributor Level 17

    4

    Lawyers agree

    Answered . From the sound of things, you should definitely represent yourself. You obviously know so much more than your attorney. And obviously the prior judge didn't know what he or she was talking about. I'm sure you can do a much better job. And I bet your attorney would appreciate it.

  5. Christopher Paul Bellmore

    Contributor Level 8

    5

    Lawyers agree

    Answered . No. Neither the State nor the judge can speak to a represented party. Even if you were to fire your attorney, the judge will not talk to you without the State present. There next to nothing a judge can do to help your case. Continuing without an attorney and discussing your case alone with a prosecutor are both unwise choices. If your attorney-client relationship is bad, it may be time to hire another attorney.

  6. Jacques Tushinsky-Fox

    Contributor Level 12

    3

    Lawyers agree

    Answered . No.

  7. Jay Scott Finnecy

    Pro

    Contributor Level 19

    1

    Lawyer agrees

    Answered . Short answer, NO.

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