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Can a lawyer sue in court for a "pregnant in mind" action.

Wellington, FL |

I was in a minor accident in Florida. No one injured at the scene. A week later my insurance company contacts me to say the other person had a miscarriage because of the accident and was demanding policy limits. They provided her paper work from the local hospital and blood work. That documentation did not say she had a miscarriage. My insurance company sent to paperwork to an expert witness- a Doctor who is the head of an OBGYN department at a major hospital. He came back to say it was biologically impossible for her to have been pregnant at the time of the accident based on the readings. He called is a bogus claim. Her lawyer is filing suit claiming she was pregnant in mind. Is that a legal term? (Her lawyer just came off a 180 day suspension of his license as noted on this site.)

Attorney Answers 8

Posted

If you haven't already let your car insurance company know about the accident, you should do so immediately. Assuming you carried liability coverage, they will defend your interests including contesting the validity of her damage claim (ie whether she was actually pregnant or not).

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Posted

If you have auto insurance, they should protect you in this situation. They will not want to pay for a claim that is not valid, so it is in their best interest to defend you in this claim.

*PLEASE READ THIS BEFORE YOU COMMENT, EMAIL OR CONTACT ME. I am only licensed in Washington. Answering this question does not create an attorney-client relationship. This answer does not constitute legal advice.

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Posted

Let your carrier and their lawyers worries about it. That's why you paid premiums, assuming you have bodily injury coverage. Be sure to "fully cooperate" with them regarding the investigation and handling of the claim.

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8 lawyers agree

Posted

Simply turn this matter over to your auto insurance carrier and let them handle it. "Pregnant in mind" kind of reminded me of "Hungry in mind". Maybe the same thing. Sounds very far fetched. Good luck.

Mr. Crosner is licensed to practice law in California and has been practicing law in California since 1978. The response herein is general legal and business analysis.. It is not intended nor construed to be "legal advice" but rather it is analysis, and different lawyers may analyze this matter differently, especially if there are additional facts not reflected in the question. Oftentimes the question does not include significant and important facts and timelines that, if known, could significantly change the reply and make it unsuitable. I am not your attorney until retained by a written retainer agreement signed by both of us. See also avvo.com terms and conditions item 9, incorporated as if it was reprinted here.

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5 lawyers agree

Posted

Let your insurance company resolve this.

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Posted

"Pregnant In Mind" = "Plaintiff Loses Case" - In Mind. Turn it over to your insurance carrier to resolve, and defend, if necessary.

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3 lawyers agree

Posted

Notify your insurance company.

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2 lawyers agree

Posted

You cannot be a little pregnant. I have never heard of the term "pregnant in mind."

Your insurance company is obviously on top of the situation and I suggest that you relax, cooperate with your carrier and let them handle this for you. That is why you pay them a premium.

Legal Disclaimer:

If this information has been helpful, please indicate below.

Mr. Lundeen is licensed to practice law in Florida and Vermont. The response herein is not legal advice and does not create an attorney/client relationship. The response is in the form of legal education and is intended to provide general information about the matter within the question. Oftentimes the question does not include significant and important facts and timelines that, if known, could significantly change the reply and make it unsuitable. Mr. Lundeen strongly advises the questioner to confer with an attorney in your state in order to ensure proper advice is received.

This ans. does not create an attorney/client relationship.

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