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Can a judge rule or make a judgement by a phone conference ??

Bloomfield, NJ |

one party filed paper work the other party did not responed . It was said the judge would call the 1st party and the lawyer . Does this happen or do you have to show up in court for any judgement to be made ?

Attorney Answers 4

Posted

It is possible for a Judge to make a ruling via a telephone conference.

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5 lawyers agree

Posted

The Judge can enter judgments and rulings by phone confernence. It is more common that the Judge would make rulings during phone conferences, rather than judgments, but it does happen. The Judge calls the relevant peeople from the Court, the Judge goes on the Record so that a transcript or recording is made, and then handles the case from there on out as if the lawyers on the phone were present in Court.

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Posted

It is possible that this can be done by phone but in most circumstances to get a judgment, they would have to show up to court. However if this was a motion hearing, it is quite possible that the ruling was made via phone conference

This answer should not be construed as creating an attorney-client relationship, and is for informational purposes only, not legal advice.

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4 lawyers agree

Posted

I agree with the other respondents that a telephonic ruling is commonplace, if the underlying standards as expressed are present. However, it is slightly more difficult to enter a judgment when the parties are not physically in the same space and a proposed judgment has been submitted to the Court which requires changes made "on the fly".

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