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Can a Canadian visiting the United States stay 6 months each visit or 6 months a calendar year?

Pittsburgh, PA |

I'm getting different answers from attorneys.

Attorney Answers 3


  1. Best answer

    The law is that anytime a Canadian comes to the U.S. as a visitor, he must establish that this is the purpose of the trip. The admission is for six months. If in fact the individual really just lives in the U.S. and only returns to Canada to extend the time in the U.S., they should not be admitted, since they intend to immigrate, not visit.

    The above is intended only as general information, and does not constitute legal advice. You must speak with an attorney to discuss your individual case.


  2. Go see a good immigration attorney. As a Canadian, you generally get 6 months. And you could probably get a 6 month extension after that. But frankly, the more time out of a year you spend here, the more likely the CBP guys are going to question whether you are a true "visitor." "Visiting" more than 6 months a calendar year will often get you stopped, and hard questions asked about where you actually live and what you do here.

    Good luck!

    John

    (610) 664-6271. John Vandenberg focuses his practice solely on immigration law. You can keep up to date on immigration law by liking the firm on Facebook at www.facebook.com/hvlawgroup. His response to your question is general in nature, as not all the facts are known to him, and does not constitute legal advice. Retain an attorney experienced in immigration law to review all the facts in your case in order to receive advice specific to your case, since that protects both you and the attorney. Mr. Vandenberg's statement above does not create an attorney/client relationship.


  3. The longer your stays in the US and the more frequent your visits, the likelier it is that you will be denied admission. Admission is for a maximum of six months.

    J Charles Ferrari Eng & Nishimura 213.622.2255 The statement above is general in nature and does not constitute legal advice, as not all the facts are known. You should retain an attorney to review all the facts specific to your case in order to receive advise specific to your case. The statement above does not create an attorney/client relationship. Answers on Avvo can only be general ones, as specific answers would require knowledge of all the facts. As such, they may or may not apply to the question.