At my company, if I am employeed on the first day of the month then I have health insurance for the whole month.

Asked over 2 years ago - Boulder, CO

At my company, if I am employeed on the first day of the month then I have health insurance for the whole month. So in the last week of June I give 2 weeks notice and say my last day will be 5th of July, can my company just tell me to leave by the last day of June and just pay me through the 5th of July so they dont have to pay the health insurance for July? Or if they are paying me through for the two weeks does that make me an employee in July? Or if I want to make sure I have health insurance in July should I just quite on the 1st with no notice.

Attorney answers (2)

  1. Christopher Daniel Leroi

    Contributor Level 20

    3

    Lawyers agree

    Answered . Just because you give two weeks notice, that does not mean that they have to keep you as an employee for those two weeks. They can fire you or agree to accept your resignation immediately to save money. To be on the safe side and not tick off your employer for letters of reference in the future, and to be sure that you have July covered in insurance, I would give your two weeks notice on July 1st and either work those 2 weeks or hope that they just tell you that you are free to leave.

  2. Douglas A Thomas

    Contributor Level 12

    2

    Lawyers agree

    Answered . Mr Leroi's answer is spot on. In addition, although most company's pay the two weeks, there is no law requiring them to do so. Many employers who think they are being used will walk the employee to the door the monument they quit and not pay the two weeks. It is always bad form to quit without notice, but there is no law requiring notice either. You actions should be governed by your relationship and your need for future references. If you have a good relationship take it straight up, give the notice and hope the company will keep you there to July 5th. In fact, be prepare to argue why they should keep you there. Good luck.

    Answering this quetion does not establish an attorney client relation. The answer is for educational purposes only.... more

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