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After sentcing can you make apt with judge and talk about your case?

Flowery Branch, GA |
Filed under: Professional ethics

ask him about the case he just sentaced

Attorney Answers 3


  1. No.

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  2. Or before or during your trial or sentencing either. You don't talk directly to a judge without the other party (the prosecutor) present and only if the Judge seeks and initiates the discussion, as in a conference or open court. If you have questions or comments, you or your attorney (better) conveys them to the prosecutor, or makes a formal motion to amend or reconsider your sentence.

    You can't just casually talk to or telephone a Judge about your case, inside or outside the courthouse. (And attempts to do so could be considered threats or stalking).

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  3. No! Why on earth would you? If you think there is some information that may change his mind that wasn't discussed at sentencing, file a motion for another sentencing hearing.

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