After an injury accident, should you give info to suing party's attorney about your other insurance policies

Asked almost 5 years ago - Saint Cloud, MN

A year ago, my then 16 yr old son made a left turn in front of a motorcyclist. The cyclist was seriously injured. We called our auto insurance company immediately, and they took over from there. Last week we received a letter from the injured party's attorney, requesting information about any other insurance policies we might have, regardless of the type. Why would they want/need to know about our medical/dental and homeowner's insurance? I am a little leery about giving out that information. Should I?

Attorney answers (2)

  1. Edgardo Rafael Baez

    Contributor Level 18

    Answered . Not without the advise of counsel. The other side may be looking for a way to compensate the client more for the injuries if the insurance company's policy did not cover it.

  2. Alan James Brinkmeier

    Contributor Level 20

    Answered . I tmay be your insurance limits are too low to cover all the damages. You should get a lawyer. Contact your insurer and let them know about all this. An attorney should be assigned. Do not disclose anything without advice of counsel.

    You might find my Legal Guide helpful "How to Choose A Lawyer For You"

    http://www.avvo.com/legal-guides/ugc/how-to-cho...

    You might find my Legal Guide helpful " What Do I Tell My Lawyer"

    http://www.avvo.com/legal-guides/ugc/what-do-i-...

    No one can know what the record is in the case because online we cannot see your documents. You need a good lawyer. Check with a lawyer in your locale to discuss more of the details.

    You need a lawyer so get one.

    Good luck to you.

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