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Adjustment of status evidence for the upcoming interview.

New York, NY |

I'm married with a US citizen. We're having our interview in a couple months. I am the beneficiary (24 years old) and she is the petitioner (20, almost 21 years old). We're living in her mom's house so we don't have any lease. She already started to work. We're using a joint sponsor because she never worked before (she is currently studying at college). How can we strongly support our case with better bona fide evidence? any suggestion? Thanks.

Attorney Answers 4


  1. There is no comprehensive list of required documents. You need to show your marriage was entered into in good faith. There are many forms of evidence such as leases, bank statements, insurance policies, travel records, utility bills, phone records, correspondence, photographs, affidavits, etc. If you are having difficulty documenting your marriage, I would encourage you to consult an experienced immigration attorney before appearing for the interview.

    Wendy R. Barlow, Esq, The Law Offices of Grinberg & Segal, P.L.L.C., 111 Broadway, Suite 1306, New York NY 10006, (866) 456-­8654, wendy@myatorneyusa.com, www.myattorneyusa.com. The information contained in this answer is provided for informational purposes only, and should not be construed as legal advice on any subject matter. No recipients of content from this answer, clients or otherwise, should act or refrain from acting on the basis of any content included in the answer without seeking the appropriate legal or other professional advice on the particular facts and circumstances at issue from a licensed attorney. Provision of information on this website does not create an attorney-client relationship between you and The Law Offices of Grinberg & Segal, P.L.L.C., nor is it intended to do so.


  2. Have her mom write a declaration about you living there, the first time the mom met you, and time spent with you. Have friends and other family members write declarations about spending time with you at parties, dinners, etc. This is a common issue for young couples. They don't have assets, numerous bills, insurance, etc. It's best to provide photos and testimonials from those that know you are a real couple and have spent time with you. Bring mail and bills addressed to you at the mother's house. This will help show you live there. Good luck.


  3. Evidence of a life in common.

    The Court of Appeals for the Seventh Circuit recently stated: "The Immigration and Nationality Act is a bit of a beast. It is not known for being warm or cuddly; words like "intricate" and "Byzantine" come more readily to mind. Nor is it known for being easy to understand; we have often re-marked on its fiendish complexity."

    You should retain an experienced immigration lawyer to review all the facts, advise you, and handle the case. You can find one through http://www.ailalawyer.com.

    J Charles Ferrari Eng & Nishimura 213.622.2255 The statement above is general in nature and does not constitute legal advice, as not all the facts are known. You should retain an attorney to review all the facts specific to your case in order to receive advise specific to your case. The statement above does not create an attorney/client relationship. Answers on Avvo can only be general ones, as specific answers would require knowledge of all the facts. As such, they may or may not apply to the question.


  4. There are other ways you can prove your relationship. You can share your correspondence with the interviewing officers, you can have mutual friends write a letter explaining your situation, her mother can write a letter as well explaining the situation, etc. If you wrote your own wedding vows you can share that as well as pictures of trips you have taken together.

    Good luck.

    The information contained on this page is for educational and informative purpose only. This response does not constitute legal advice. The readers of this information should not act based solely based on information contained herein. Answers can only be general, as specific responses can only be provided with full knowledge of case facts.

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